The British Dominions in North America: Or, A Topographical and Statistical Description of the Provinces of Lower and Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, the Islands of Newfoundland, Prince Edward, and Cape Breton. Including Considerations on Land-granting and Emigration. To which are Annexed Statistical Tables and Tables of Distances &c. ...

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H. Colburn & R. Bentley, 1831 - Canada
 

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Page 179 - Majesty's dominions in America ; and that the American fishermen shall have liberty to dry and cure fish in any of the unsettled bays, harbours, and creeks of Nova Scotia, Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled ; but so soon as the same or either of them shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such settlement, without a previous agreement for that purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.
Page 171 - Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish. And also that the inhabitants of the United States shall have liberty to take fish of every kind on such part of the coast of Newfoundland, as British fishermen shall use (but not to dry or cure the same on that island), and also on the coasts, bays, and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Page 179 - Whereas differences have arisen respecting the Liberty claimed by the United States for the Inhabitants thereof, to take, dry, and cure Fish on certain Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks of His Britannic Majesty's Dominions in America, it is agreed between The High Contracting Parties, that the Inhabitants of the said United States shall have forever, in common with the Subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the Liberty to take Fish of every kind on that part of the Southern...
Page 178 - States shall continue to enjoy unmolested the right to take fish of every kind on the Grand Bank, and on all the other banks of Newfoundland; also, in the Gulph of St. Lawrence, and at all other places in the sea, where the inhabitants of both countries used at any time heretofore to fish...
Page 179 - America, it is agreed between the high contracting parties that the inhabitants of the said United States shall have for ever, in common with the subjects of His Britannic Majesty, the liberty to take fish of every kind...
Page 16 - Vaudreuil, running north twenty-five degrees east until it strikes the Ottawa River, to ascend the said river into the Lake Temiscamingue, and from the head of the said lake by a line drawn due north until it strikes the Boundary Line of Hudson's Bay, including all the territory to the westward and southward of the said line, to the utmost extent of the country commonly called or known by the name of Canada...
Page 179 - Islands, on the western and northern coast of Newfoundland, from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, on the shores of the Magdalen Islands, and also on the coasts, bays, harbours and creeks from Mount Joly on the southern coast of Labrador, to and through the straits of Belle Isle and thence northwardly indefinitely along the coast...
Page 163 - A space large enough for a door, and another for a window, are cut through the walls ; under the centre of the cottage, a square pit or cellar is dug, for the purpose of preserving potatoes and other vegetables during winter ; over this a floor of boards or logs, hewn flat on the upper side, is laid, and another over head, to form a sort of garret. When...
Page 221 - And Esau took his wives, and his sons, and his daughters, and all the persons of his house, and his cattle, and all his beasts, and all his substance, which he had got in the land of Canaan ; and went into the country from the face of his brother Jacob. 7 For their riches were more than that they might dwell together; and the land wherein they were strangers could not bear them because of their cattle.
Page 122 - ... of the nearest stream, or at once to the stream itself; fallen trees and other impediments in the way of the oxen are cut away with an axe. " The whole winter is thus spent in unremitting labour: the snow covers the ground from two to three feet from the setting in of winter until April ; and, in the middle of fir forests, often till the middle of May.

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