Report of the Transactions at the Annual Meeting

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Vols. for 1846-48, 1850, 1851, and 1853 contain the Proceedings.
 

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Page 12 - Moreover you have added a lofty temple, in which continual day remains, without night," (to wit,) "a sparkling tower that reflects from heaven the first rays of the rising sun. It has five compartments pierced by open windows, and on all four sides as many ways are open. The lofty peaks of the tower are capped with pointed roofs, and are adorned with various and sinuous vaults, curved with well-skilled contrivance." " Above these stands a rod with golden balls, and at the top a mighty golden cock...
Page 53 - He was placed in the king's service when about 22 or 23 years of age, and in 1356 was made clerk of all the king's works in his manors of Henle and Yeshamsted. In the same year he was appointed surveyor of the king's works at the castle, and in the park of Windsor".
Page 15 - Am I bewitched? or have I taken leave of my senses? Had I not once a most delectable wood in this spot? But when he understood the truth, he was violently enraged. Then the bishop put on a shabby vestment, and made his way to the king's feet, humbly begging to resign the episcopate, and merely requesting that he might retain his royal friendship and chaplaincy.
Page liii - Cathedral, namely, to bring together all the recorded evidence that belongs to the building, excluding historical matter that relates only to the see or district ; to examine the building itself for the purpose of investigating the mode of its construction, and the successive changes and additions that have been made to it ; and lastly, to compare the recorded evidence with the structural evidence as much as possible.
Page 4 - This window, when compared with the surrounding ones, exhibits most strikingly the characteristic features of the time. It is superior to the other glass paintings in the fulness and arrangement of its colours, but it is less brilliant, owing to the greater depth of the shading, to which the increased roundness of the figures is owing. In point of execution, I apprehend that it is as nearly perfect as painted glass can be. In it the shadows have attained their proper limit. Deeper shadows would have...
Page 61 - ... as almost to impair its character of genuineness. Jovius is, for various reasons, not likely to have been himself at Winchester during the visit of the Emperor in 1522, yet his account is probably correct ; for the Table had certainly been repaired not long before that year ; as we learn from the entry in the foreign accounts of Henry VIII., of 661. 16s. lid. for the repair of the "aula regis infra castrum de Wynchestre et le Round Tabyll ibidem.
Page 30 - ... members of it are measures of the whole, so the ancients have, with great propriety, determined that in all perfect works, each part should be some aliquot part of the whole ; and since they direct, that this be observed in all works, it must be most strictly attended to in temples of the gods, wherein the faults as well as the beauties remain to the end of time.
Page xxix - Ireland is formed in order to examine, preserve, and illustrate all Ancient Monuments of the History, Manners, Customs and Arts of our Forefathers.
Page 29 - • the span of the east and west arches as great as possible, in order to leave the view from one end to the other of the church unobstructed. The transverse view from one transept to the other is of less consequence, especially in the early churches, in which the choir of the monks always occupied the central tower. The necessary strength is thus given to the piers by increasing their longitudinal dimensions at the expense of the transverse.

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