The Parliamentary Register: Or an Impartial Report of the Debates that Have Occured in the Two Houses of Parliament, Volume 1

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Page 244 - Were it joined with the legislative, the life, liberty, and property of the subject would be in the hands of arbitrary judges, whose decisions would be then regulated only by their own opinions, and not by any fundamental principles of law ; which, though legislators may depart from, yet judges are bound to observe. Were it joined with the executive, this union might soon be an overbalance for the legislative.
Page 244 - IN this distinct and separate existence of the judicial power in a peculiar body of men, nominated indeed, but not removable at pleasure, by the crown, consists one main preservative of the public liberty ; which cannot subsist long in any state, unless the administration of common justice be in some degree separated both from the legislative and also from the executive power.
Page 36 - That an humble address be presented to his majesty, that he would be graciously pleased to direct...
Page 54 - But there are cases, Sir, in which our public duty is so clear and imperious, that no desire of praise, no motive of personal respect, no wish to gratify our friends, nor any other consideration, however powerful, can possibly enable us to dispense with it, and in my conscience, Sir, I believe this to be one of those cases. If the marks of respect were such as did not compromise my public duty in the compliance, no person would join in it more cheerfully and more eagerly than I would.
Page 1 - In pursuance of the authority given to us. by his Majesty's commission, under the Great Seal, amongst other things, to declare the cause of his holding this parliament, his Majesty has been graciously pleased to direct us to...
Page 544 - ... sufficient justification in point of quantity, to the committee of ways and means, to adopt such measures and impose such taxes, as shall be then recommended to them ; and this proceeding (arising out of that regard and attention which the house of commons ought at all times to shew towards the people, that the burthens imposed upon them may not be larger than the public exigencies require) ought ror this rear-on, if for no other, to be most strictly adhered to.
Page 558 - An Act for granting to his Majesty during the present War, and until the Sixth Day of April next after the Ratification of a Definitive Treaty of Peace, further additional Rates and Duties in Great Britain on the Rates and Duties on Profits arising from Property, Professions, Trades, and Offices...
Page 4 - His majesty is fully persuaded, that whatever pride and confidence you may feel in common with him in the success which has distinguished the British arms in...
Page 53 - ... or at his death. But when I see a minister, who has been in office above twenty years, with the full command of places and public money, without any peculiar extravagance and waste, except what might be expected from the carelessness that perhaps necessarily arose from the multiplicity of duties, to which the attention of a man, in such a situation, must be directed; when I see a minister...
Page 240 - ... he looked upon the independence and uprightness of the judges, as essential to the impartial administration of justice ; as one of the best securities of the rights and liberties of his subjects; and as most conducive to the honour of the crown.

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