The Gallery of Nature and Art: Or, a Tour Through Creation and Science, Volume 3

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Page 245 - Arcadian plain. Pure stream, in whose transparent wave My youthful limbs I wont to lave ; No torrents stain thy limpid source, No rocks impede thy dimpling course, That sweetly warbles o'er its bed, With white round polished pebbles spread...
Page 50 - Dares stretch her wing o'er this enormous mass Of rushing water ; scarce she dares attempt The sea-like Plata ; to whose dread expanse, Continuous depth, and wondrous length of course, Our floods are rills.
Page 267 - The bosom of the mountains spreading here into a broad basin, discovers in the midst Grasmere Water ; its margin is hollowed into small bays, with bold eminences, some of rock, some of soft turf, that half conceal and vary the figure of the little lake they command ; from the shore a low promontory pushes itself far into the water, and on it stands a white village with the parish...
Page 33 - twixt anger, shame, and fear, Those for what's past, and this for what's too near My eye descending from the Hill, surveys Where Thames among the wanton vallies strays : Thames ! the most lov'd of all the Ocean's sons By his old sire, to his embraces runs, Hasting to pay his tribute to the sea, Like mortal life to meet eternity ; Though with those streams he no resemblance hold, Whose foam is amber, and their gravel gold : His genuine and less guilty wealth to' explore, Search not his bottom, but...
Page 363 - Totally therefore we might suppress the waves in any required place, if we could come at the windward place where they take their rise. This in the ocean can seldom if ever be done. But perhaps something may be done on particular occasions, to moderate the violence of the waves when we are in the midst of them, and prevent their breaking where that would be inconvenient. For, when the wind blows fresh, there are continually rising on the back of every great wave a number of small ones, which roughen...
Page 47 - Cubagua; whence he sailed to Spain. The vanity natural to travellers who visit regions unknown to the rest of mankind, and the art of an adventurer, solicitous to magnify his own merit, concurred in prompting him to mingle an extraordinary proportion of the marvellous in the narrative of his voyage. He pretended to have discovered nations so rich, that the roofs of their temples were covered with plates of gold ; and described a republic of women, so warlike and powerful, as to have extended their...
Page 263 - In the evening walked alone down to the Lake by the side of Crow-Park after sunset, and saw the solemn colouring of night draw on, the last gleam of sunshine fading away on the hill-tops, the deep serene of the waters, and the long shadows of the mountains thrown across them, till they nearly touched the hithermost shore. At distance heard the murmur of many waterfalls not audible in the day-time. Wished for the Moon, but she was 'dark to me and silent, hid in her vacant interlunar cave'.
Page 34 - O could I flow like thee, and make thy stream My great example, as it is my theme! Though deep, yet clear, though gentle, yet not dull, Strong without rage, without o'er-flowing full.
Page 263 - ... but the mountains know well that these innocent people will not reveal the mysteries of their ancient kingdom, "the reign of Chaos and Old Night:" only I learned that this dreadful road, dividing again, leads one branch to Ravenglas, and the other to Hawkshead.
Page 267 - ... emerald, with their trees and hedges, and cattle, fill up the whole space from the edge of the water...

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