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" Mr. President, I shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts ; she needs none. There she is. Behold her, and judge for yourselves. There is her history ; the world knows it by heart. The past, at least, is secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington,... "
Marsh's New Manual of Reformed Phonetic Short-hand, Being a Complete ... - Page 119
by Andrew Jackson Marsh - 1892 - 120 pages
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Remarks on the Life and Writings of Daniel Webster of Massachusetts

George Ticknor - 1831 - 48 pages
...President, I shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts—she needs none. There she is—behold her, and judge for yourselves. There is her history:...is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker Hill—and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for...
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The National Orator;: Consisting of Selections, Adapted for Rhetorical ...

Charles Dexter Cleveland - American literature - 1832 - 284 pages
...and the country ; or if I see an uncommon endowment of heaven — if I see extraordinary capacity and virtue in any son of the South — and if, moved by...Lexington, and Bunker Hill — and there they will remain for ever. The' bones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for independence, now lie mingled with...
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Speeches and Forensic Arguments, Volume 1

Daniel Webster - United States - 1835
...in hand they stood round the administration of Washington, and felt his own great arm lean on thom for support. Unkind feeling, if it exist, alienation....Bunker Hill — and there they will remain forever. The hones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for Independence, now lie mingled with the soil of...
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The American Orator's Own Book: Or, The Art of Extemporaneous Public ...

Oratory - 1836 - 328 pages
...let me remind you, that in early times no states cherished greater harmony, both of principle and of feeling, than Massachusetts and South Carolina. Would...Lexington, and Bunker Hill ; and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, fallen in the great struggle for independence, now lie mingled with...
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The United States Speaker: a Copious Selection of Exercises in Elocution ...

John Epy Lovell - Elocution - 1836 - 504 pages
...let me remind you that in early times no states cherished greater harmony, both of principle and of feeling, than Massachusetts and South Carolina. Would...secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker's Hill ; and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, fallen in the great struggle...
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The Reader and Speaker: Containing Lessons for Rhetorical Reading and ...

Samuel Putnam - Readers - 1836 - 215 pages
...since sown. They are weeds, the seeds of which that same great arm never scattered. Mr. President, 1 shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts —...secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker's Hill ; and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, fallen in the great struggle...
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The American Orator's Own Book: A Manual of Extemporaneous Eloquence ...

Oratory - 1840 - 279 pages
...went through the revolution — hand in hand they stood round the administration of Washington, nnd felt his own great arm lean on them for support. Unkind...Lexington, and Bunker Hill ; and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, fallen in the great struggle for independence, now lie mingled with...
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The Quarterly Review

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle), George Walter Prothero - English literature - 1841
...me indulge in refreshing remembrance of the past — let me remind you that in early times no stntes cherished greater harmony, both of principle and feeling,...Lexington, and Bunker Hill — and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for Independence, now lie mingled with...
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The Quarterly review, Volume 67

1841
...on them for support. Unkind feeling, if it exist, alienation and distrust, are the growth, unrmtuml to such soils, of false principles since sown. They...Lexington, and Bunker Hill — and there they will remain for ever. The bones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for Independence, now lie mingled with...
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The First-class Reader

Benjamin Dudley Emerson - Readers (Elementary) - 1841 - 276 pages
...none. There she la; behold her. and judge for yourselves. — There is her history. The world know it by heart. The past, at least, is secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker Hilt; and there they will remain forever. The bones of her sons, falling in the great struggle for...
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