Marsh's New Manual of Reformed Phonetic Short-hand, Being a Complete Progressive Guide to the Best System of Phonography and Verbation Reporting

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Page 120 - If discord and disunion shall wound it — if party strife and blind ambition shall hawk at and tear it — if folly and madness — if uneasiness, under salutary and necessary restraint shall succeed to separate it from that union, by which alone its existence is made sure, it will stand, in the end, by the side of that cradle in which its infancy was rocked; it will stretch forth its arm with whatever of vigor it may still retain, over the friends who gather round it; and it will fall at last,...
Page 98 - Tis sweet to hear the watch-dog's honest bark Bay deep-mouthed welcome as we draw near home; Tis sweet to know there is an eye will mark Our coming, and look brighter when we come...
Page 119 - Sir, does he suppose it in his power to exhibit a Carolina name so bright as to produce envy in my bosom?
Page 101 - But when my father came not here, I thought if we could find the sea, We should be sure to meet him there, And once again might happy be. We hand in hand went many a mile, And...
Page 117 - There is another reason why those, especially who are women of quality, should apply themselves to letters; namely, because their husbands are generally strangers to them.
Page 119 - State lines, than their talents and patriotism were capable of being circumscribed within the same narrow limits. In their day and generation, they served and honored the country, and the whole country; and their renown is of the treasures of the whole country. Him, whose honored name the gentleman himself bears— does he suppose me less capable of gratitude for his patriotism, or sympathy for his sufferings, than if his eyes had first opened upon the light in Massachusetts, instead of South Carolina?
Page 118 - I claim part of the honor, I partake in the pride, of her great names. I claim them for countrymen, one and all. The...
Page 118 - Learning and knowledge are perfections in us, not as we are men, but as we are reasonable creatures, in which order of beings the female world is upon the same level with the male.
Page 119 - State or neighborhood ; when I refuse for any such cause, or for any cause, the homage due to American talent, to elevated patriotism, to sincere devotion, to liberty and the country ; or if I see an uncommon endowment of heaven, if I...
Page 119 - Mr. President, I shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts ; she needs none. There she is. Behold her, and judge for yourselves. There is her history ; the world knows it by heart. The past, at least, is secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker Hill ; and there they will remain for ever.

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