Epistolary curiosities; unpublished letters of the seventeenth (eighteenth) century, illustrative of the Herbert family, ed. by R. Warner

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Contents

From the Bishop of Worcester to Lord Herbert
17
Copy and enclosure to Lord Herbert
18
From Lord Godolphin to Mr Stepney
24
From Lord Godolphin to Lord Herbert
25
From Lord Godolphin to Lord Herbert
26
From Lord Herbert to the Duke of Newcastle
27
From the same to the same
28
From Lord Somers to Lord Herbert
29
From Lady Dudley to her mother
30
From Lord Herbert to Sir Henry Every
31
From Sir H Every to Lord Herbert
32
From Henry Herbert esq to Lord Herbert
33
From Lord Herbert to the Lord Viscount Here ford
36
From Lord Hereford to Lord Herbert
37
From Lord Herbert to Lord Hereford
38
To Mr Secretary Vernon
40
To the same
43
To the same
44
To the same
45
To the same
46
From Mr Greg to Mr Stepney
47
From the same to the same 1
49
From the same to the same
50
From the same to the same
51
From the Duke of Marlborough to Mr Stepney
52
From Queen Anne to the Emperor
53
From Queen Anne to the Empress
55
Fromthe Duke of Marlborough to Mr Stepney
57
From the same to the same
58
From the same to the Emperor
59
From C Sibourg to Mr Cardonnel
61
From the Duke of Marlborough to Mr Stepney
62
From the same to the Emperor
65
From the same to the Prelates c of Cologne
67
From the same to the Bishop of Paterbome
68
From Mr Cardonnel to Mr Stepney
69
From the same to the same
71
From the same to the same
73
LIU From the same to the same
74
From the same to the same
75
From the same to the same
77
From the same to the same
79
From the same to the same
81
From the same to the same
82
From the Duke of Shrewsbury to Mr Stepney
84
From the same to the same
89
From the same to the same
92
From the same to the same
93
From the sameto the same
97
Fromthe same to the same
99
From the same to the same
101
From the same to the same
103
From the same to the same
104
From the same to the same
126
LXXXIH From the same to the same
127
IXXXIV From the same to the same
129
From the same to the same
133
From the same to the same
135
From the same to the same
136
From the same to the same
137
From the same to the same
139
From the same to the same
140
From the same to the same
142
From the same to the same
143
From the same to the same
145
From Sir R Sutton to G Stepney esq
147
From the same to the same
153
From the same to the same
157
From the same to the same
164
CHI From the same to the same
167
From the same to the same
173
From the same to the same
174
From John Hefferman to Mr Fury
176
From Sir Robert Sutton to Mr Stepney
177
From the same to the same
179
From Mr Cresset to the same
181
From the same to the same
184
From the same to the same
186
From the same to the same T
188
From the same to the same
190
From the same to the same
191
From the same to the same
193
From the same to the same
194
From the same to the same
196
From the same to the same
197
From the same to the same
199
From the same to the same
200
CXXI From the same to the same
201
From the Duke of Buckingham to the same
202
GXXIII From the Duke of Somerset to the same
205
From William Pulteney to the same
208
From Mr Tilson to the same
209
From the same to the same
213
From Lord Raby to the same
216
CXXVIIl From the same to the same
217
From the same to the same
218
From Dr Robinson to the same
220
From the same to the same
223
From the same to the same
226
From Mr Addison to the same
229
From the same to the same
231
From the same to the same
233
From the same to the same
235
Fom Mr Harley to the same
237
PXXXV1H From Sir Rich Steele to Mr G Lewis
240

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Page 153 - The author was then young, his invention at the height, and his reading fresh in his head.
Page 55 - ... in all points so exact, that there was not a circumstance in his whole deportment that was liable to censure; he paid an extraordinary respect to the queen, and yet maintained a due greatness in it; he had an art of seeming well pleased with every thing, without so much as smiling once all the while he was at court, which was only three days; he spoke but little, and all he said was judicious and obliging.
Page 186 - George, on the contrary, soon after his arrival in England, was heard to say, " My maxim is, never to abandon my friends, to do justice to all the world, and to fear no man.
Page 234 - ... it is universally confessed that he was unequal to the duties of his place. In the house of commons he could not speak, and therefore was useless to the defence of the government. In the office, says Pope, he could not issue an order without losing his time in quest of fine expressions.
Page 236 - Another, they say, desired the Lord in his prayer, that as he had formerly made their nation one of the heads of Europe, he would not now make it one of the tails. But as it is natural for a turbulent discontented party to make more noise than those who are pleased with the ordinary course of affairs, though they are much the fewer in number, so they tell us that not only the parliament, but throughout the kingdom, the majority is for the union.
Page 1 - one of those divine men, who, like a chapel in a palace, remain unprofaned, while all the rest is tyranny, corruption, and folly.
Page 207 - Some of their chiefs were princes of the land ; In the first rank of these did Zimri...
Page 187 - January, 1698, having had by the Princess Sophia six sons, George Lewis (afterwards King George I.) Frederic Augustus, Maximilian William, Charles Philip, Christian, and Ernest Augustus ; and one daughter, Sophia Dorothy, who, in the year 1684, became the second wife of Frederic, the third King of Prussia. The Princess Sophia was one of the most accomplished and excellent women of her age. At once good and great, she was a perfect example of all those virtues which have been reflected on her illustrious...
Page 244 - You know you are sure, and hope that will prevail upon you not to do a surprising thing to my disadvantage. Care is taking to bring you in your money before the term, and your civility cannot be a prejudice, since that is within the time you could propose by the severest methods. Your most...
Page 154 - Lordship once told me, that you would endeavour to justify the sincerity of your change by a conscientious regard to all other parts and actions of your life. I am sure you cannot more effectually condemn your own act, than by being a worse man after your profession...

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