The Quarterly Review, Volume 66; Volume 84

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John Murray, 1849 - English literature
 

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Page 131 - The tawny lion, pawing to get free His hinder parts, then springs, as broke from bonds, And rampant shakes his brinded mane...
Page 116 - It was some time before the Sheikh could be prevailed upon to descend into the pit, and convince himself that the image he saw was of stone. " This is not the work of men's hands...
Page 116 - This is not the work of men's hands," exclaimed he, "but of those infidel giants of whom the Prophet, peace be with him ! has said, that they were higher than the tallest date tree ; this is one of the idols which Noah, peace be with him ! cursed before the flood.
Page 590 - Lévite — such was the phrase then in use — might be had for his board, a small garret, and ten pounds a year, and might not only perform his own professional functions, might not only be the most patient of butts and...
Page 78 - Bill it be meant that we are to live in a perpetual vortex of agitation — that public men can only support themselves in public estimation by adopting every popular impression of the day, by promising the instant redress of...
Page 418 - I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding ; and, lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down.
Page 557 - I know I have the body of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and of a king of England too, and think foul scorn that Parma or Spain, or any prince of Europe should dare to invade the borders of my realm...
Page 600 - But, during the latter part of the seventeenth century, the culture of the female mind seems to have been almost entirely neglected. If a damsel had the least smattering of literature she was regarded as a prodigy. Ladies highly born, highly bred, and naturally quick witted, were unable to write a line in their mother tongue without solecisms and faults of spelling such as a charity girl would now be ashamed to commit.!
Page 586 - St. Peter's Chapel in the Tower. Within four years the pavement of the chancel was again disturbed, and hard by the remains of Monmouth were laid the remains of Jeffreys. In truth there is no sadder spot on the earth than that little cemetery. Death is there...
Page 559 - He acquired a boundless command of the rhetoric in which the vulgar express hatred and contempt. The profusion of maledictions and vituperative epithets which composed his vocabulary, could hardly have been rivalled in the fish-market or the bear-garden.

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