The Works of Francis Bacon ...: Philosophical works

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Longmans, 1857
 

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Page 316 - Neither are they fitly to be called images, because they generate still, and cast their seeds in the minds of others, provoking and causing infinite actions and opinions in succeeding ages : so that, if the invention of the ship was thought so noble, which' carrieth riches and commodities from place to place, and consociateth the most remote regions in participation of their fruits ; how much more are letters to be magnified, which, as ships, pass through the vast seas of time, and make ages so distant...
Page 342 - And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things.
Page 293 - Faithful are the wounds of a friend ; but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful.
Page 393 - For the mind of man is far from the nature of a clear and equal glass, wherein the beams of things should reflect according to their true incidence; .nay, it is rather like an enchanted glass, full of superstition and imposture, if it be not delivered and reduced.
Page 479 - Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me : and again a little while and ye shall see me ; and, Because I go to the Father ? They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while ? we cannot tell what he saith.
Page 292 - But this is that which will indeed dignify and exalt knowledge, if contemplation and action may be more nearly and straitly conjoined and united together than they have been ; a conjunction like unto that of the two highest planets, Saturn, the planet of rest and contemplation, and Jupiter, the planet of civil society and action.
Page 284 - For the wit and mind of man, if it work upon matter, which is the contemplation of the creatures of God, worketh according to the stuff, and is limited thereby ; but if it work upon itself, as the spider worketh his web, then it is endless, and brings forth indeed cobwebs of learning, admirable for the fineness of thread and work, but of no substance or profit.
Page 296 - Surely there is a vein for the silver, And a place for gold where they fine it. Iron is taken out of the earth, And brass is molten out of the stone.
Page 145 - But thus you see we maintain a trade, not for gold, silver, or jewels, nor for silks, nor for spices, nor any other commodity of matter, but only for God's first creature, which was light; to have light, I say, of the growth of all parts of the world.
Page 163 - Then after divers meetings and consults of our whole number, to consider of the former labours and collections, we have three that take care, out of them, to direct new experiments, of a higher light, more penetrating into nature than the former.

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