Fraser's Magazine, Volume 89

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1874
 

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Page 171 - The Clouds that gather round the setting sun Do take a sober colouring from an eye That hath kept watch o'er man's mortality; Another race hath been, and other palms are won.
Page 381 - Never, never more, shall we behold that generous loyalty to rank and sex, that proud submission, that dignified obedience, that subordination of the heart, which kept alive, even in servitude itself, the spirit of an exalted freedom.
Page 508 - God Almighty first planted a garden; and, indeed, it is the purest of human pleasures; it is the greatest refreshment to the spirits of man; without which buildings and palaces are but gross handyworks...
Page 197 - I rejoice that America has resisted. Three millions of people, so dead to all the feelings of liberty as voluntarily to submit to be slaves, would have been fit instruments to make slaves of the rest.
Page 10 - Will you walk into my parlour?" said the Spider to the Fly," 'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I have many curious things to show when you are there."
Page 380 - a should not think of God ; I hoped there was no need to trouble himself with any such thoughts yet: So, 'a bade me lay more clothes on his feet : I put my hand into the bed, and felt them, and they were as cold as any stone ; then I felt to his knees, and so upward, and upward, and all was as cold as any stone.
Page 625 - My soul, like to a ship in a black storm, Is driven I know not whither.
Page 381 - Thus the mind itself is bowed to the yoke: even in what people do for pleasure, conformity is the first thing thought of; they like in crowds; they exercise choice only among things commonly done: peculiarity of taste, eccentricity of conduct, are shunned equally with crimes: until by dint of not following their own nature they have no nature to follow: their human capacities are withered and starved: they become incapable of any strong wishes or native pleasures, and are generally without either...
Page 626 - Come, come, my lord, untie your folded thoughts, And let them dangle loose, as a bride's hair.
Page 54 - What you say about the profits is very handsome : I like to deal with such men. As for myself, be assured that I am far above all pecuniary views, and no other person, I think, has any claim to share with you. Make the most of it, therefore, and let all your views in life be directed to a solid, however moderate, independence ; without it no man can be happy, nor even honest...

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