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SURVEYING,

WITH A DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTRUMENTS

AND THE NECESSARY TABLES,

INCLUDING

A TABLE OF NATURAL SINES.

BY CHARLES DAVIES,

AUTHOR OF MEXTAL AND PRACTICAL ARITHMETIC, FIRST LESSONS IN ALGEBRA,
ELEMENTS OF DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY, SHADES SHADOWS AND
PERSPECTIVE, ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY, AND DIFFE-

RENTIAL AND INTEGRAL CALCULUS.

FOURTH EDITION.

PUBLISHED BY
A. S. BARNES & Co, HABTFORD.-WILEY & PUTNAM; COLLINS, KEESE & CO,
New-YORK.–PERKINS & MARVIN, Boston.—THOMAS, COWPERTUWAIT
& Co, PHILADELPHIA.-CUSHING & SONS, BALTIMORE.

RE11169

HARVARD
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY
046*172

ENTERED, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1835,

By CHARLES DAVIES,
In the Clerk's Office of the Southern District of New-York.

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STEREOTYPED BY HENRY W. REES,

PREFACE.

Tue Elements of Surveying, published by the author in 1830, was designed especially as a text-book for the Military Academy, and in its preparation little regard was had to the supposed wants of other Institutions.

It was not the aim of the author to make it so elementary as to admit of its introduction into academies and schools, and he did not, therefore, anticipate for it an extensive circulation.

It has been received, however, with more favor than was anticipated, and this circumstance has induced the author to re-write the entire work. In doing so, he has endeavored 10 make it both plain and practical.

It has been the intention to begin with the very elements of the subject, and to combine those elements in the simplest manner, so as to render the higher branches of plane-surveying comparatively easy.

All the instruments needed for plotting have been carefully described; and the uses of those required for the measurement of angles are fully explained.

The conventional signs adopted by the Topographical Beaureau, and which are now used by the United States Engincers in all their charts and maps, are given in plates 5 and 6.

Should these signs be generally adopted in the country, it would give entire uniformity to all maps and delineations of ground, and would establish a kind of language by which all the peculiarities of soil and surface could be accurately represented.

An account is also given of the manner of surveying the public lands; and although the method is simple, it has, nevertheless, been productive of great results, by defining, with mathematical precision, the boundaries of lands in the new States, and thus settling their titles on an indisputable

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