Galileo, Darwin, and Hawking: The Interplay of Science, Reason, and Religion

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, Mar 15, 2005 - Religion - 205 pages
The history of the interaction between science and religion is fraught with tension, although, as philosopher Phil Dowe demonstrates, many thoughtful and religious people have also found harmony between these two crucial fields. This fascinating book insightfully surveys the relationship of science, reason, and religion, giving special attention to the most contentious topics -- cosmology, evolution, and miracles.

Providing a superb introduction to the philosophy of science, Dowe's Galileo, Darwin, and Hawking contends that there are four basic ways to relate science and religion. Two of them, naturalism and religious science, present these endeavors as antagonistic. By contrast, an independence view understands them as wholly unrelated. Finally, an interaction account sees religion and science as complementary -- perhaps even dependent on one another. Dowe finds this last perspective the most historically and philosophically compelling. He argues his case by exploring the history of science, highlighting the life and work of three scientific giants: Galileo Galilei, Charles Darwin, and Stephen Hawking.
 

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Contents

Darwins The Origin of Species
113
Natural Selection or Special Creation?
118
Darwin and God
125
Darwin and Asa Gray
127
From the Monkey Jibe to the Monkey Trial
131
Creation Science
137
Big Bang Cosmology and God
142
The Kalam Cosmological Argument and the Infinite Universe
143

Conclusion
38
The Hermeneutics of Science and Religion Realism and Antirealism
40
Osianders Preface
41
Antirealist Accounts of Science
42
Scientific Realism and Inference to the Best Explanation
46
Antirealism in Philosophy of Religion
49
Knowledge and Power
57
The Image of God
59
Descartes Rationality and the Perspicuity of Nature
62
Francis Bacons Vision of Science and Technology
66
Bacon and the Cultural Mandate
70
TwentiethCentury Critiques of the Baconian Vision
72
The Mutual Relevance of Science and Religion
79
Miracles
82
Humes Theory of Rational Belief
83
Testimonial Evidence
86
The Concept of a Miracle
87
Humes Limitation
94
Humes Second Argument against Miracles
97
Schlesingers Defense of Miracles
99
Creation and Evolution
104
Paleys Design Argument
109
Big Bang Cosmology
146
The Anthropic Principle
148
God as an Explanation
154
Chance and Many Worlds Explanations
158
The Inverse Gamblers Fallacy
160
The Observer Selection Effect
164
Denial of the Need for Explanation
167
God and Chance
170
Providence
173
Three Models of Providence
175
Quantum Chance
178
Chance and Providence
183
Physical Chance Divine Cause
184
Physical Chance No Divine Cause
186
Meaningless Coincidences
187
Conclusion
189
The Interaction of Science and Religion
191
Defeasibility and the God of the Gaps Objection
193
Conclusion
195
Bibliography
196
Index
201
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About the author (2005)

Phil Dowe is senior lecturer in philosophy at theUniversity of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. His otherbooks include Physical Causation.

Phil Dowe is senior lecturer in philosophy at theUniversity of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. His otherbooks include Physical Causation.-

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