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BOOK I.,

WITH

ERRATA.

For note on Formac, page 66, read

Formae, objective genitive. The genitive is called objective when it is regarded as the object towards which the substantive on which it depends is directed: as, amor patriae, the love of country, i.e., the love which we have for our country, where country is the “ object” of our love. The objective genitive may have for signs such words as in, for, with, regarding, done to, &c. : as, injuria spretae formae, wrong done to her slighted beauty.

For note on Danaum, page 66, read

Danaum is the old form of the gen., and is here “the subjective genitive.” The genitive is called subjective when it is regarded as the subject from which the substantive on which it depends proceeds: as, amor parentis, the love of the parent, i.e., the love which the parent has for us, where the parent is the “subject” who loves.

In page 137 insert-
Quamvis, ady. Although, honerer.

LONDON:
JOSEPII BOULTON & CO., CENTRAL SCHOOL DEPÔT,

4, WORSHIP STREET, AND PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.; SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & CO.; HAMILTON, ADAMS & Co.

1883.

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BOOK 1.,

WITI

EXAMINATION PAPERS,

NOTES AND VOCABULARY.

BY

THE REV. J. ROBERTSON, LL.D.,

22

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“EARLY

AUTHOR OF “DAILY EXERCISES IN SCRIPTURE HISTORY, " " GOSPEL QUESTIONS,

“ DAILY READINGS IN NATURAL SCIENCE, “DAILY EXERCISES IN ARITH-
METIC AND ALGEBRA,

LATIN EXERCISES,” “ARITHMETIC
FRACTIONAL,

HALF-HOUR EXAMINATION PAPERS, " "DAILY READINGS IN
LATIN NOUNS,' “UNIVERSITY LOCAL HALF-HOUR EXAMINATION PAPERS,

DAILY READINGS IN LATIN VERBS, EARLY FRENCH LESSONS," ETC.

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LONDON:
JOSEPH BOULTON & CO., CENTRAL SCHOOL DEPÔT,

4, WORSHIP STREET, AND PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.;
SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & CO.; HAMILTON, ADAMS & CO.

1883.

27. q
.

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PREFACE.

The Editor has aimed at simplicity in the Notes, avoiding difficult critical questions as being unsuited to the class of pupils for whom the book is intended. In the text he has retained the old style of spelling, in accordance with the practice of the University Examiners, but in the Papers and Notes has used the modern in order to accustom the pupils to the sight of words in both systems. In the Examination Papers attention has been drawn to the various Figures of Speech used by Virgil in the Aeneid, and also to the difficult scanning of a few lines, which questions, however, can be omitted by younger pupils at the discretion of the master. Particular reference has been made to the Geographical, Historical and Mythological allusions in the Aeneid, as it is essential that these should be known in order to gain a clear insight into the poet's descriptions. That these Papers may be practically useful in preparing pupils for the Local and other Examinations, very full questions have been set on the Genders and different cases of the Nouns, &c., and the principal parts of the Verbs. The Editor firmly believes that pupils well drilled in these Papers will be able to gain good places in the Class Lists.

J. R.

UPTON HOUSE,

ADELAIDE ROAD, N.W.

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