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BOOK I.,

WITH

EXAMINATION PAPERS,

NOTES AND VOCABULARY.

BY

THE REV. J. ROBERTSON, LL.D.,

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DAILY EXERCISES IN SCRIPTURE HISTORY," GOSPEL QUESTIONS,"
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DAILY READINGS IN NATURAL SCIENCE," DAILY EXERCISES IN ARITH-
METIC AND ALGEBRA,
EARLY LATIN EXERCISES," ARITHMETIC
FRACTIONAL, "HALF-HOUR EXAMINATION PAPERS," "DAILY READINGS IN
LATIN NOUNS,' UNIVERSITY LOCAL HALF-HOUR EXAMINATION PAPERS,'
DAILY READINGS IN LATIN VERBS," EARLY FRENCH LESSONS,' ETC.

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JOSEPH BOULTON & CO., CENTRAL SCHOOL DEPOT,
4, WORSHIP STREET, AND PATERNOSTER Row, E.C.;
SIMPKIN, MARSHALL & CO.; HAMILTON, ADAMS & CO.

1883.

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PREFACE.

THE Editor has aimed at simplicity in the Notes, avoiding difficult critical questions as being unsuited to the class of pupils for whom the book is intended. In the text he has retained the old style of spelling, in accordance with the practice of the University Examiners, but in the Papers and Notes has used the modern in order to accustom the pupils to the sight of words in both systems. In the Examination Papers attention has been drawn to the various Figures of Speech used by Virgil in the Aeneid, and also to the difficult scanning of a few lines, which questions, however, can be omitted by younger pupils at the discretion of the master. Particular reference has been made to the Geographical, Historical and Mythological allusions in the Aeneid, as it is essential that these should be known in order to gain a clear insight into the poet's descriptions. That these Papers may be practically useful in preparing pupils for the Local and other Examinations, very full questions have been set on the Genders and different cases of the Nouns, &c., and the principal parts of the Verbs. The Editor firmly believes that pupils well drilled in these Papers will be able to gain good places in the Class Lists.

UPTON HOUSE,

ADELAIDE ROAD, N.W.

J. R.

ARGUMENT.

THE story told in the First Book of the Aeneid is that of Aeneas, after the capture of Troy, who, having wandered nearly seven years in search of a new settlement, is driven to the coast of Libya by a tremendous storm, which was raised by Aeolus at the request of Juno, who had a strong feeling of hatred against the Trojans. On landing, Aeneas kills seven deer, which he distributes among his followers, and encourages them to hope for better things. Venus, his mother, intercedes with Jupiter on their behalf, and he unfolds to her the coming events, and predicts the greatness of the Roman Empire, which Aeneas is to found. She thereupon disguises herself as a maiden of the country, and goes forth to meet him. She informs him of the safety of the remaining portion of his fleet, and of his companions, and directs him to enter the city of Carthage, which Dido was then building. Encompassed by her in a cloud, which rendered him invisible, he enters the city, and there meets his lost friends, and is graciously welcomed by Dido, who provides for him a grand banquet. Venus causes Cupid to assume the form of his son Ascanius, and inspire Dido with a passionate love for Aeneas.

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