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Father from the Spirit, by introducing a man between them, thereby giving the creature a priority, or precedence, to the Holy Ghost.

Of all such persons it may be said, that as the Jews sought to kill our Lord, because He said God was His Father, making Himself equal with God (John v. 18); so such persons justify the Jews for crucifying Christ; for they crucified Him for saying He was the Son of God (John xix. 7). And, in so doing, they crucify to themselves the Son of God afresh, and put Him to an open shame (Heb. vi. 7.) Surely of all such professors, it may be justly observed, where the mystery of the faith begins, their religion ends!

Remember, O believer, that Antichrist "is he that denieth the Father and the Son" (1 John ii. 22). As there were many Antichrists in the days of the apostles, so there have been since, and are existing in our days, as the awful heresy of water regeneration, &c., doth prove.

May our great and glorious Lord, who never instituted an ordinance to make a schism in the body, mercifully pardon any error in this little tract, and bless the truth contained in it, to the end whereunto it is set forth, namely, to the keeping of the unity of the Spirit, and the bond of peace, that there be no schism in the one body of which Christ is the Head—the Lord graciously grant it for His name's sake. Amen.

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APOSTOLICAL IN ITS ORIGIN, EPISCOPAL IN ITS GOVERNMENT,

AND

SCRIPTURAL IN ITS BELIEF;

WHEREIN", ALSO,

ITS CLAIMS, IN OPPOSITION TO

POPERY AND DISSENT,

ARE CONSIDERED AND ASSERTED.

BY THE REV. THO. P. PANTIN, M.A.,

OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD; SECTOR OF WKSTCOTE, NEAR STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, GLOUCE8TERSH IRE.

'Remember the days of old, consider the years of many generations; ask thy father, and he will shew thee, thy elders, and they will tell thee." Deuteronomy X\xi I. 8.

LONDON:
WERTHEIM AND MACINTOSH,

24, PATERNOSTER-ROW.

C. J. STEWART, 11, KING WILLIAM-STREET, STRAND.

Price6d. for single copies or not less than 25, 8s.; 50, 14s.; 100,25s.

I. The Church of England, Apostolical in its Origin;
as derived from the. British and Anglo-Saxon Churches,

4, 5,30, 81.

1. The British Chu eh, spoken of by ancient Church writers,

4, 5, 10, 11, 14, 15, 19.—Founded in the Apostles' times, fr—8.

—First Christian King, 9, 10.—Persecuted under Diocletian,

10, 11; and under the Saxons, 17, 2a.—Councils and Con-

ferences, in connexion with, and of the British Church, 12,13,

15, 21, 22 —Arianism and Pelagianism invade it, 13—16.—

The Church extended to North Britain and Ireland, by Britons

and Scots of their Communion, 18.

2. The Anglo- Saxon Church. Britons first preachers to the

heathen Saxons, 19, 20. — Christianity openly professed

among tliem in Kent, 19, 20.—The Roman Mission ; iss com-

mencement, extension, and decline, 20 — 25. — Christianity

mostly reitored by missionaries and bishops of, or derived

from, the British stock, 25—30.—Their union with the Anglo-

Saxon Church; before, and under its first metropolitan, 30,

31 The final result, 31.

II. The Church of England, Episcopal in its Go-

vernment.

The Episcopacy of the Holy Scriptures, 82.—Ancient and

modern writers on the Episcopal succession, and wherein it

consists, 32, 33 Proofs of British Episcopacy, 33, 34.

t

III. The Church of England, Scriptural in its Belief.

. Proved from its Vlth Article of Religion; and from ancient

Ohurch writers, 34—36 When much corrupted, and reformed,

• 36, 37.—From all which particulars, we conclude its Claim

we opposition to Popery and Dissent. As to ropery; from its

rightfuhindependence, 37, 38,—and Freedom from Popish op-

pression in Government and Religion, 38, 39.—As to Dissent;

from its Apostolical Church Government, 39—41—and Faith

and Practice, 41, 42.—The Separation of Dissenters from the

Church of England, contrary to Holy Scripture; while, accord-

ing to Holy Scripture, Communion with the Roman Chorea

is impossible, 42—44.

Appendix, 45—48.

LICAL IN ITS ORIGIN, ETC.'

SECTION I.

The Church of England, Apostolical in its Origin.

Century I. Our S iviour's command, 4.—The universal diffusion of the Gospel, attested by Holy Scripture, and ancient Cborch writers, 4, 5.—The Church of England, Apostolical in its Origin.—Its first Teachers; St.Paul especially spoken of, 4—8. Century II. Lucius, the first Christian king ; his history, 9—10. Century III. Alleged persecution, 10.—Tertul

lian and Origen on Christianity in Britain, 10, 11.—Druidical

worship, 11. Century IV. The Diocletian persecution; and

its victims in Britain, 11.—Constantine, the first Christian emperor, a Briton, 11.—Councils enumerated, and their Canons; British bishops, when present, 12, 13.—Arianism in Britain, 13.

—Orthodoxy of the British bishops, 14, 15. Century V.

Pelagins, a Briton; Councils against his heresy in Britain, at which Gallic bishops assist, 15, 16 —Home taken, 16.—Saxons

arrive in Britain, 16 Roman walls and fortes in Britain,

16, 17. — Anglo-Saxon persecution, and eventual flight of . British bishops, 17.—British and Scottish preachers, at various times, establish Christianity in North Britain and Ireland, 18. — The British Liturgy noticed, 18, 19. —

Arnobius on Christianity in Britain, 19. Century VL

Gildas, Kentigern, and other Britons, preach to the heathen Saxons, 19.—Christianity openly professed by the Princess Bertha, in Kent, 19.—St. David, the British metropolitan, overthrows Pelagianism, 20.—Bertha, attended by Bishop Luidhard, at Canterbury, 20.—The Roman mission, under Aiifjus

tine, and King Ethelbert's conversion, 20, 21. Century VII.

Extension of the Anglo-Saxon Church, 21.—Augustine's conferences with the British clergy ; his demands, and their refusal and massacre, 21—24.—The remarkable decline of the Roman mission, 24, 25.—Wini, the only canonical bishop, surviving, 25.

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