A Handbook in Outline of the Political History of England to 1882

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Page 170 - An Act to subject certain publications to the duties of stamps upon newspapers, and to make other regulations for restraining the abuses arising from publication of blasphemous and seditious libels.
Page 194 - Having once given her sanction to a measure, that it be not arbitrarily altered or modified by the Minister ; such an act she must consider as failing in sincerity towards the Crown, and justly to be visited by the exercise of her Constitutional right of dismissing...
Page 40 - Moreover, we have granted for us and our heirs, as well to archbishops, bishops, abbots, priors, and other folk of holy Church, as also to earls, barons, and to all the commonalty of the land, that for no business from henceforth...
Page 151 - His Majesty allowed Earl Temple to say that whoever voted for the India Bill was not only not his friend, but would be considered by him as an enemy ; and if these words were not strong enough, Earl Temple might use whatever words he might deem stronger and more to the purpose.
Page 238 - THE power of the crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished...
Page 92 - Majesty, that he was loose and absolved from rules of government, and that he had an army in Ireland, which he might employ to reduce this kingdom ; for which he deserves to undergo "the pains and forfeitures of high treason.
Page 257 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges commissions be made quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established; but upon the address of both houses of parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
Page 82 - Wherefore, Mr Speaker, her Majesty's pleasure is, That if you perceive any idle heads, which will not stick to hazard their own estates, which will meddle with reforming the Church and transforming the Commonwealth, and do exhibit any bills to such purpose, that you receive them not, until they be viewed and considered by those who it is fitter should consider of such things...
Page 108 - They declared that there was no legislative power in either or both houses without the king ; that the league and covenant was unlawfully imposed ; that the sole supreme command of the militia, and of all forces by sea and land, had ever been by the laws of England the undoubted right of the crown ; that neither house of parliament could pretend to it, nor could lawfully levy any war offensive or defensive against his majesty.
Page 82 - It consisted of forty-four commissioners, twelve of whom were bishops, many more privycounsellors, and the rest either clergymen or civilians. This commission, after reciting the acts of supremacy, uniformity, and two others, directs them to inquire from time to time, as well by the oaths of twelve good and lawful men, as by witnesses and all other means they can devise, of all offences, contempts, or misdemeanours done and committed contrary to the tenor of the said several acts and statutes...

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