Unreliable Sources

Front Cover
Pan Macmillan UK, Mar 11, 2010 - History - 356 pages

Through many decades of groundbreaking journalism, John Simpson now turns his eye to how Great Britain has been transformed by its free press down the years. He shows how, while the press likes to pretend it's independent, they have enjoyed the power they have over the events they report and have at times exercised it irresponsibly.

In this self-analysis some searching questions are asked, including whether the press can ever be truly free and whether we would desire it to be so.

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About the author (2010)

John Simpson is the BBC's World Affairs Editor. He has twice been the Royal Television Society's Journalist of the Year. He has also won three BAFTAs, including the Richard Dimbleby award in 1991 and the News and Current Affairs award in 2000 for his coverage, with the BBC News team, of the Kosovo conflict. He has written four volumes of autobiography, Strange Places, Questionable People, A Mad World, My Masters, News from No Man's Land and, most recently, Not Quite World's End, a childhood memoir, Days from a Different World and The Wars Against Saddam.

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