The Natural Selection of Autonomy: Redefining Competence and Femininity

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SUNY Press, Jan 1, 1998 - Philosophy - 193 pages
The Natural Selection of Autonomy challenges the deep traditional assumption that autonomy, morality, and moral responsibility are uniquely human characteristics. By examining autonomy on a larger scale in the natural world, it clears away the mysteries associated with autonomy claims and shows what is valuable and adaptive (for humans and other animals) in genuine open alternatives--and how human reason strengthens, rather than creates, autonomous behavior.

Drawing on recent research in biology, psychology, and philosophy, The Natural Selection of Autonomy attacks widely shared and deeply held beliefs that have passed from the historical pre-Darwinian philosophical tradition into contemporary thought, and offers a clear look at the evolution of autonomous moral behavior among many species, including--but not limited to--human animals.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Natural Autonomy and Alternative Possibilities
5
Natural Authenticity
17
Moral Responsibility
31
Responsibility and the SelfMade Self
41
Virtue Vice and Moral Responsibility
51
Moral Development without Moral Responsibility
67
Bitter Fruits Just Deserts and Natural Consequences
81
What Reason Adds to Animal Morality
113
The Moral Foundations
127
Darwinian Moral Nonobjectivism
143
Conclusion Darwinist Care Ethics
155
Notes
167
References
181
Index
191
Copyright

Morality without Reason
97

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About the author (1998)

Bruce N. Waller is Associate Professor, Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies, Youngstown State University. His previous work includes Critical Thinking: Consider the Verdict and Freedom Without Responsibility.

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