Considerations on the Royal Marriage Act: And on the Application of that Statute to a Marraige Contracted and Solemnized Out of Great Britain

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J. Ridgway, 1811 - Great Britain - 80 pages
 

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Page 13 - Act had never been made, unless both Houses of Parliament shall, before the expiration of the said twelve months, expressly declare their disapprobation of such intended marriage.
Page 3 - Council) ; and that every Marriage, or matrimonial Contract, of any such Descendant, without such Consent first had and obtained shall be null and void to all intents and purposes whatsoever.
Page 3 - Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King's most excellent Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual, and temporal...
Page 5 - Whether it might not be wise and expedient to supply the defect of the laws now in being, and, by some new provision, more effectually to guard the descendants of his late Majesty King George the second...
Page 11 - Kings of this realm,' is founded on a doctrine absurd and unconstitutional, but which hereafter will have the force of a Parliamentary declaration of law, the immediate tendency of which is to create as many prerogatives in the Crown as there are matters of importance in the State, and indeed to extend them in a manner as vague and exceptionable as had ever been done in the...
Page 14 - ... in the dominions of Great Britain. It provides no remedy at any age, against the improvident marriage of the King reigning, the marriage, of all others, the most important to the public.
Page 17 - ... throughout their whole lives, than that •we acknowledge a right to keep men or women in a state of endless nonage, which, unless in the case of idiots or incurable lunatics, would be absurd, unjust, and a manifest violation of the law of nature.
Page 4 - That every person who shall knowingly or. wilfully presume to solemnize, or to assist, or to be present at the celebration of any marriage with any such descendant, or at his or her making any matrimonial contract, without such consent as aforesaid first had and obtained, except in the case...
Page 10 - ... this weighty matter into our serious consideration, and, being sensible that marriages in the royal family are of the highest importance to the state, and that therefore the kings of this realm have ever been entrusted with the care and approbation thereof...
Page 10 - Bill, to be without foundation in law (in the extent there stated), to be unnecessary for the avowed purposes of the Bill, and likely to be attended with very dangerous consequences, as that preamble does assert, 'That we are sensible that marriages in the royal family are of the highest importance to the State, and that therefore the Kings of this realm have ever been entrusted with the care and approbation thereof.

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