Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture: Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s-1950s

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Jan 1, 2003 - History - 405 pages
Focusing on portrayals of Mussolini's Italy, Hitler's Germany, and Stalin's Russia in U.S. films, magazine and newspaper articles, books, plays, speeches, and other texts, Benjamin Alpers traces changing American understandings of dictatorship from the la
 

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In Dictators, Democracy, and American Public Culture: Envisioning the Totalitarian Enemy, 1920s – 1950s, Benjamin L. Alpers argues that, while Americans treat dictatorship and democracy as polar ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
THE ROMANCE OF A DICTATOR DICTATORSHIP IN AMERICAN PUBLIC CULTURE 1920S1935
15
THE TOTALITARIAN STATE MODERN DICTATORSHIP AS A NEW FORM OF GOVERNMENT 1920S1935
59
THE DISAPPEARING DICTATOR DECLINING REGARD FOR DICTATORS AMID GROWING FEARS OF DICTATORSHIP 19361941
77
THE AUDIENCE ITSELF IS THE DRAMA DICTATORSHIP AND THE REGIMENTED CROWD 19361941
94
DICTATOR ISMS AND OUR DEMOCRACY THE RISE OF TOTALITARIANISM 19361941
129
THIS IS THE ARMY THE PROBLEM OF THE MILITARY IN A DEMOCRACY 19411945
157
HERE IS GERMANY UNDERSTANDING THE NAZI ENEMY 19411945
188
THE BATTLE OF RUSSIA THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE COMMUNISM AND TOTALITARIANISM 19411945
220
A BOOT STAMPING ON A HUMAN FACEFOREVER TOTALITARIANISM AS NIGHTMARE IN POSTWAR AMERICA
250
NOTES
303
BIBLIOGRAPHY
347
INDEX
381
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Page 362 - History proves that dictatorships do not grow out of strong and successful governments, but out of weak and helpless ones. If by democratic methods people get a government strong enough to protect them from fear and starvation, their democracy succeeds ; but if they do not, they grow impatient. Therefore, the only sure bulwark of continuing liberty is a government strong enough to protect the interests of the people and...

About the author (2003)

Benjamin L. Alpers is Reach for Excellence Associate Professor in the Honors College and associate professor of history and film and video studies at the University of Oklahoma.

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