Page images
PDF
EPUB

Drathatis personae.

COVENT-GARDEN.

[ocr errors]

LOVE GOLD, the Miser,
FREDERICK, his son,
CLERIMONT,
RAMILIE, servant to Frederick,
Mr. Decoy, a broker,
Mr. FURNISH, an upholsterer,
Mr. SPARKLE, a jeweller,
Mr. SATIN, a mercer,
Mr. List, a tailor,
CHARLES BUBBLEBOY,
A LAWYER,
JAMES,

Men.
Mr. Ryder.
Mr. Farren,
Mr. Macready.
Mr. Lewis.
- Mr. Thompson.

Mr. Ledger.
Mr. Evatt.
Mr. Lee.
Mr. C. Powell.

[ocr errors]

Mr. Rock,
Mr. Cubit.

HARRIET, Lovegold's daughter,
Mrs. WISELY,
MARIANA,
LAPPET, maid to Mariana,
WH.EED LE,

Servants, &c.
SCENE, London,

Women.
Mrs. Mountain.
Miss Platt.
Mrs. Mattocks.
Mrs. Abington.
Miss Stuart.

B

Dramatis Personai.

DRURY-LANE.

LOVEGO 1.D, the Miser,
FREDERICK, bis sun,
CLERIMONT,
RAMILIE, servant to Frederiek,
Mr. Decor, a broker,
Mr. FURNISH, an upholsterer,
Mr. SPARKLE, a jeweller,
Mr. SATIN, a mercer,
Mr. List, a tailor,
CHARLES BUBBL EBOY,
A LAWYER,
JAMES,

Men.
Mr. Moss.
Mr. Whitfield.
Mr. Barrymore.
Mr. Paliner.
Mr. Fawcett.
Mr. Wrighten.
Mr. Phillimore.

Mr. Norris.
· Mr. Holcroft.

[merged small][ocr errors]

HARRIET, Lovegold's daughter,
Mrs. WISELY,
MARIANA,
LAPPET, maid 10 Mariana,
WHEED LE,

Servants, &c.

Women,
Miss Collins.
Mrs. Johnson.
Mrs. Brereton.
Miss Pope.
Miss Kirby.

SCENE, London.

THE MISER.

ACT I. SCENE 1.

LOVECOLD's House.

Enter LAPPET and RAMILIE,

Lappet. I'll hear no more.

Perfidionis fellow! have I for thee slighted so many good matches ; have I for thee turn'd off Sir Oliver's steward and my Lord Landy's butler, and several others thy betters, and all to be affronted in so public a manner ?

Ram. Do but hear me, Madam.

Lap. If thou wouldst have neglected me, was there nobody else to dance a minuet with but Mrs. Susan Cross-stich, whom you know to be my utter aversion?

Ram. Curse on all balls! henceforth I shall hate the sound of a violin.

Lap. I have more reason, I am sure, after having been the jest of the whole company: what must they

out I are Mrs. W

Wheed

think of me when they see you, after having countenanced

your addresses in the eye of the world, take out another lady before me?

Ram. I'm sure the world must think worse of me did they imagine, Madam, I could prefer any other

lately.

Your m

to you.

find the

Ram. him: bie

ment tin

Court of

deuce ta

Lap. None of your wheedling, Sir, that won't do. If ever you hope to speak to me more, let me see you affront the little minx in the next assembly you meet her.

Ram. I'll do it; and luckily, you know, we are to have a ball at my Lord Landy's the first night he lies out of town, where I'll give your revenge ample satisfaction.

Lap. On that condition I pardon you this time ; but if ever you do the like again

Ram. May I be banish'd for ever from those dear eyes, and he turn'd out of the family while you live in it.

to town a mind to silver tid

with som

music. ·

Lap.

Wheed. you prefe

Ram.

Enter Wheedle.

[ocr errors]

Lap. V

drille mo

Wheed. Dear Mrs. Lappet !
Lap. My dear! this is extremely kind.

Wheed. It is what all your acquaintance must do that expect to see you. It is in vain to hope for the favour of a visit.

Lap. Nay, dear creature! now you are barbarous. My young lady has staid at home so much, I have not stress is ! had one moment to myself; the first time I had gone

Wheed. out since flourishin chiefs : i

Lap. V

Wheed.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small]

out I am sure, Madam, would have been to wait on Mrs. Wheedle.

Wheed. My lady has staid at home too pretty much lately. Oh, Mr. Rannilie!, are you confind too? Your master does not stay at home I am sure; he can find the way to our house tho’you can't.

Ram. That is the only happiness, Madain, I envy him: but faith I don't know how it is in this parliament time, one's whole days are so taken up in the Court of Requests, and one's evenings at quadrille, the deuce take me if I have seen one opera since I came to town. Oh! now I mention operas, if you have a mind to see Cato, I believe I can steal my master's silver ticket, for I know he is engag'd to-morrow with some gentlemen who never leave their bottle for music.

Lap. Ah, the savages !

Wheed. No one can say that of you, Mr. Ramilie ; you prefer music to every thing

Ram. -But the ladies. [Bell rings.] So, there's my summons.

Lap. Well, but shall we never have a party of quadrille more ?

Wheed. Oh, don't name it! I have work'd my eyes out since I saw you; for my lady has taken a whim of flourishing all her old cambrick pinners and handkerchiefs : in short, my dear! no journeywoman sempstress is half so much a slave as I am.

Lap. Why do you stay with her?
Wheed. La, child! where can one better one's self?

[merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]
« PreviousContinue »