Hecho en Tejas: Texas-Mexican Folk Arts and Crafts

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Joe S. Graham
University of North Texas Press, 1997 - Social Science - 358 pages
When the early Spanish and Mexican colonists came to settle Texas, they brought with them a rich culture, the diversity of which is nowhere more evident than in the folk art and folk craft. This first book-length publication to focus on Texas-Mexican material culture shows the richness of Tejano folk arts and crafts traditions.
 

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Hecho en Tejas: Texas-Mexican folk arts and crafts

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This collection of essays, which explores the rich material culture of Texas-Mexican artisans, is a fine addition to the growing body of literature on Hispanic arts and crafts. The broad cultural ... Read full review

Contents

Hecho a Mano en Tejas
1
MexicanAmerican Folk Art in San Antonio
48
The MexicanAmerican Quilting Traditions of Laredo San Ygnacio and Zapata
77
Vaquero Folk Arts and Crafts in South Texas
93
The Case of a South Texas Community
117
The Fine Art of Making Paper Flowers
131
The Figural Ceramics of José Varela
146
Miguel Acosta Instrumentista
172
TexasMexican Religious Folk Art in Robstown Texas
222
MexicanAmerican Yard Art in Kingsville
250
Grutas in the Spanish Southwest
263
MexicanAmerican Roadside Crosses in Starr County
278
The Origins and Forms of a Folk House
293
The Built Environment of a TexasMexican Ranch
309
Bibliography of TexasMexican Material Culture
335
Contributors
345

The PiñataMaking Tradition in Laredo
188
Tejano Saddlemakers and the Running W Saddle Shop
204

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Page 8 - ... art to the extent that the intention was esoteric and traditional. The artistic nature of a folk artifact is generally subordinate to its utilitarian nature so that most folk art exists within the immediate context of folk craft. The problem of folk art (as opposed to folk craft) scholarship, then, lies less in identifying specific forms and technics than it does in identifying the characteristics of the traditional aesthetic philosophy that governs the selection, production, treatment, and use...

About the author (1997)

JOE S. GRAHAM was a professor of Anthropology and Folklore at Texas A&M University, Kingsville and worked under Don Americo Paredes in Mexican-American folklore at the University of Texas. He was born and grew up on ranches in the Big Bend country of West Texas.

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