Characteristics of Literature

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Lindsay and Blakiston, 1851 - English literature - 282 pages

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Page 190 - Vext the dim sea : I am become a name ; For always roaming with a hungry heart Much have I seen and known ; cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments...
Page 190 - I am a part of all that I have met; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Gleams that untravell'd world, whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move. How dull it is to pause, to make an end, To rust unburnish'd, not to shine in use ! As tho
Page 190 - Much have I seen and known ; cities of men And manners, climates, councils, governments, Myself not least, but honour'd of them all ; And drunk delight of battle with my peers, Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy. I am a part of all that I have met ; Yet all experience is an arch wherethro' Gleams that untravell'd world, whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move.
Page 174 - Tis a little thing To give a cup of water ; yet its draught Of cool refreshment, drain'd by fever'd lips, May give a shock of pleasure to the frame More exquisite than when nectarean juice Renews the life of joy in happiest hours.
Page 150 - tis but a sound; a name of air; A minute's storm, or not so much : to tumble From bed to bed, be massacred alive By some physicians, for a month or two, In hope of freedom from a fever's torments Might stagger manhood ; here the pain is past, Ere sensibly 'tis felt.
Page 276 - The time is out of joint : — 0 cursed spite, That ever I was born to set it right!
Page 150 - What danger's half so great as thy revolt? Thou art a faithless sister, else thou know'st Malice, or any treachery beside, Would stoop to my bent brows: why, I hold fate Clasped in my fist, and could command the course Of time's eternal motion, hadst thou been One thought more steady than an ebbing sea.
Page 238 - I have often thought, that a comment upon the capacities of the players would very much improve the delight that way, and impart it to those who otherwise have no sense of it.
Page 149 - Tis true, you guess aright ; sit up and listen, With shame and passion now I must confess, Since first mine eyes beheld you, in my heart You have been only king. If there can be A violence in love, then I have felt That tyranny : be record to my soul The justice which I for this folly fear.
Page 72 - Tis in the advance of individual minds That the slow crowd should ground their expectation Eventually to follow ; as the sea Waits ages in its bed till some one wave Out of the multitudinous mass, extends The empire of the whole, some feet perhaps, Over the strip of sand which could confine Its fellows so long time : thenceforth the rest, Even to the meanest, hurry in at once...

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