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Books Books 1 - 10 of 40 on ... yet thus being kept from manurance and their cattle from running abroad, by this....
" ... yet thus being kept from manurance and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint they would quickly consume themselves, and devour one another. "
Home Government for Ireland: Irish Federalism! Its Meaning, Its Objects, and ... - Page 98
by Isaac Butt - 1871 - 116 pages
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Vindicię Hibernicę, or, Ireland vindicated

Mathew Carey - 1819
...none of them fall by the sword, nor bee slain by the souldiour ; yet thus being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint they would quietly consume themselves, anddevoure one another; the proofe whereof I saw sufficiently in these...
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Vindiciae Hibernicae, Or, Ireland Vindicated: An Attempt to Develop and ...

Mathew Carey - Ireland - 1823 - 1 pages
...none of them fall by the sword; nor bee slain by the souldiour: yet thus beinc kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint, they would quietly consume themselves, and devoure one another ; U\c. proofe whereof I saw sufficiently in these...
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History of Ireland: From the Anglo-Norman Invasion Till the Union ..., Volume 2

William Cooke Taylor, William Sampson - Ireland - 1833
...renewal of the like inhuman proceedmgs, he uses these words : — " Being thus kept from manurance and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint, they would quietly consume themselves and devour one another ; the proof whereof I saw sufficiently in those late...
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A Memoir on Ireland Native and Saxon

Daniel O'Connell - Great Britain - 1843
...none of them fall by the sword,nor be slaine ' by the soldiour : yet thus being kept from man' urance, and their cattle from running abroad, by ' this hard restraint THEY WOULD QUIETLY CON' SUME THEMSELVES, AND DEVOURE ONE ANOTHER !' — Spencer's Ireland, p. 165. These counsels...
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History of Ireland and the Irish People: Under the Government of England

Samuel Smiles - Ireland - 1844 - 484 pages
...should none of them fall by the sword, nor be slain by the eoldiour, yet thus being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint, they would quiet/y consume themselves and devoure one another." The savage deputy acted upon the savage poet's...
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The Life and Times of Aodh O'Neill, Prince of Ulster, Called by the English ...

John Mitchel - Tyrone's Rebellion, 1597-1603 - 1845 - 252 pages
...none of them fall by the sword, nor be slaine by the souldiours, yet thus being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard...quickly consume themselves and devoure one another."! And so " in a short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentifull countrey...
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The History of the Volunteers of 1782

Thomas MacNevin - Dungannon volunteer meetings - 1845 - 250 pages
...none of them fall by the sworde, nor be slaine by the soldiour ; yet their being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard...restraint THEY WOULD QUICKLY CONSUME THEMSELVES AND DEVOUR ONE ANOTHER." — Spenser's Ireland, p. 165. The result of the false and vicious morality which...
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An Ecclesiastical History of Ireland: From the Period of the English ...

Michael John Brenan - Ireland - 1845 - 504 pages
...should none of them fall by the sword nor be slain by the soldier, yet their being kept from manurunce and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint they would quickly consume themsilvea and devour one another. The proof whereof I saw sufficiently in the late warres of Munster."...
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The Dublin Review, Part 2

Nicholas Patrick Wiseman - 1848
...approved of the system, and recommended its re-adoption, says, the wretches " being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad by this hard restraint, they would quietly consume themselves and devour one another." 1 he consequence of this system, he says, was,...
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Lights and shades of Ireland

Asenath Nicholson - 1850
...should none of them fall by the sword, nor be slain by the soldiour, yet thus being kept from manurance, and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint, they would quietly consume themselves, and devour one another." Reader, do you believe this advice was heeded...
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