Home Government for Ireland: Irish Federalism! Its Meaning, Its Objects, and Its Hopes

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J. Falconer, 1871 - Federal government - 116 pages
 

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Page 104 - From that moment, as by a charm, the tumults subsided ; obedience was restored ; peace, order, and civilization, followed in the train of liberty. When the day-star of the English constitution had arisen in their hearts, all was harmony within and without — Simul alba nautis, Stella refulsit, Defluit saxis agitatus humor ; Concidunt venti, fugiuntque nubes, Et minax (quod sic voluere) ponto Unda recumbit.
Page 98 - ... they were brought to such wretchedness as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death ; they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 69 - Marry so there have been divers good plots devised, and wise counsels cast already about reformation of that realm : but they say, it is the fatal destiny of that land, that no purposes whatsoever which are meant for her good, will prosper or take good effect...
Page 98 - ... after, insomuch as the very carcasses they spared not to scrape out of their graves ; and if they found a plot of watercresses or shamrocks, there they flocked as to a feast for the time, yet not able long to continue therewithal; that in short space there were none almost left, and a most populous and plentiful country suddenly left void of man and beast...
Page 69 - He reserveth her in this unquiet state still, for some secret scourge, which shall by her come unto England, it is hard to be known, but yet much to be feared.
Page 98 - ... yet thus being kept from manurance and their cattle from running abroad, by this hard restraint they would quickly consume themselves, and devour one another.
Page 98 - Munster; for, notwithstanding that the same was a most rich and plentiful country, full of corn and cattle, that you would have thought they should have been able to stand long, yet ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and...
Page 18 - Imperial expenditure: to leave to an Imperial Parliament the power of dealing with all questions affecting the Imperial Crown and Government, legislation regarding the Colonies and other dependencies of the Crown, the relations of the United Empire with Foreign States, and all matters appertaining to the defence and stability of the Empire at large; to attain such an adjustment of the relations between the two countries, without any interference with the prerogatives of the Crown, or any disturbance...
Page 18 - Ireland, while leaving to the imperial parliament the power of dealing with all questions affecting the imperial crown and government, legislation regarding the colonies and other dependencies of the crown, the...
Page 18 - To obtain for our country the right and privilege of managing our own affairs, by a parliament assembled in Ireland, composed of her Majesty the sovereign, and her successors, and the Lords and Commons of Ireland ; To secure for that parliament, under a federal arrangement, the right of legislating for and regulating all matters relating to the internal affairs of Ireland, and control...

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