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tering the ignorant multitude, lending his naine and popularity to the anarchists, seconded by their vociferations, denounced incessantly, as counter-revolutionists, those intelligent persons who were desirous at least of having things discussed. To oppose the acts of union appeared to Cambon an overt act of treasoll. The wish so much as to reflect and to deliberate was in his eyes a grout crime. Ho calumniated our intentions. The voice of every deputy, especially, my voice, would infallibly have been stilled. There were spics on the very monosyllables that escaped our lips.

L E T T E R

TO

WILLIAM ELLIOT, ESQ.,

OCCASIOWED BY

THE ACCOUNT GIVEN IN A NEWSPAPER OF THE

SPEKCII MADE IN TIIE HOUSE OF LORDS

BY TIIE **** OF

IX TIIR DEBATE

CONCERNING LORD FITZWILLIAM.

1795.

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LETTER.

MY

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BeacONSFIELD, May 26, 1795.
Y DEAR SIR, - I have been told of the vol-

untary which, for the entertainment of the Ilouse of Lords, has been lately played by his Grace the **** of *******

a great deal at my expense, and a little at his own. I confess I should have liked the composition rather better, if it had been quite new. But every man has his taste, and his Grace is an admirer of ancient music.

There may be sometimes too much even of a good thing. A toast is good, and a bumper is not bad: but the best toasts may be so often repeated as to disgust the palate, and ceaseless rounds of bumper3 may nauseate and overload the stomach. The cars of the most steady-voting politicians may at last bo stunned with “three times three.” I am sure I havo

been very grateful for the flattering remembranco . made of me in the toasts of the Revolution Society,

and of other clubs formed on the same laudable plan. After giving the brimming honors to Citizen Thomas Paine and to Citizen Dr. Priestley, the gentlemen of these clubs seldom failed to bring me forth in my turn, and to drink, “Mr. Burke, and thanks to him for the discussion he has provoked.”

I found myself elevated with this lionor; for, even by the collision of resistance, to be the means of

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