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it raw flesh. Nothing can exceed the tenderness with which the Arab treats his horse in general; yet there is one era in its life when he acts in a very opposite manner. When he desires to try its powers, he brings it out, springs upon its back, and its first expedition is a hurried one of perhaps fifty miles, without one moment's res. pite; after which he plunges it into water just deep enough to receive the whole of its jaded body. If afterwards his mare eats as if nothing had happened, he considers her as having established her character as a genuine member of the Kochlani breed.

The pig is not more domesticated in Ireland than the horse is in Arabia. Almost every man has his horse, not for burden, but for his own pleasure and convenience. In his tent, his own dwelling, the animal resides like a member of the family. During the day, it is generally kept saddled at the door, ready to start upon any excursion which its master may desire to take. By night, it sleeps amidst the family, whom it takes care never to hurt, and who carress it as they would caress a favourite individual amongst themselves. Kept from food by day, it is regaled by night with a nose-bag full of barley, which is removed in the morning. It is furnished with shoes of soft flexible iron, hammered cold, and very small, that its swiftness may not be impeded. The saddle is of wood, covered with Spanish leather, and the stirrups are short,

ARABIAN HORSES.

so as to admit of the rider occasionally standing considerably removed above the animal's back. The Arab uses no stimulant. A slight pressure will make the animal Ay like the wind; and if, in the midst of his career, the rider should fall off, the horse will stop till he is remounted. The ordinary relation between man and horse is of the kindliest description. The Arab never beats the gentle creature which exerts itself so generously for his pleasure. He is constantly discoursing to it in kind terms, calling it by every endearing epithet, and evidently believing that it understands and appreciates every word he

says. It is said that every Bedouin has some secret sign, to which he accustoms his horse, and by which he intimates when he wishes it to put out its utmost speed. Lamartine mentions a fact of an Arab having made off with a favourite mare. The owner mounted another and pursued. He gained on the thief, and cried out to him “ Pinch her right ear and give her the stirrup.” This was done, and horse and rider were soon out of sight! But why did the owner tell the thief his secret? Because he would not have it said that his mare could be overtaken!

The kindness with which the Arabian horse is treated from a foal, gives him an affection for his master, a wish to please, a pride in exerting every energy in obedience to his commands, and, consequently, an apparent sagacity which

it raw flesh. Nothing can exceed the tenderness with which the Arab treats his horse in general; yet there is one era in its life when he acts in a very opposite manner. When he desires to try its powers, he brings it out, springs upon its back, and its first expedition is a hurried one of perhaps fifty miles, without one moment's respite; after which he plunges it into water just deep enough to receive the whole of its jaded body. If afterwards his mare eats as if nothing had happened, he considers her as having established her character as a genuine members of the Kochlani breed.

The pig is not more domesticated in Irelan than the horse is in Arabia. Almost every has his horse, not for burden, but for pleasure and convenience. In dwelling, the animal resides the family. During the saddled at the don excursion which By night, it takes car they w them

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is seldom seen in other breeds. Bishop Heber thus speaks of one which he rode in India :“My morning rides are very pleasant. My horse is a nice, quiet, good-tempered little Arab, who is so fearless that he goes without starting close to an elephant, and so gentle and docile that he eats bread out of my hand, and has almost as much attachment and as many coax. ing ways as a dog. This seems the general character of the Arab horses, to judge from what I have seen in this country. It is not the fiery dashing animal which I had supposed, but with more rationality about him, and more apparent confidence in his rider, than the majority of English horses.”

Considering the lonely life of the Arab, the character of the animal, and the mutual dependence established between them, it is not surprising that he regards his horse with the intensest feeling of love and admiration.

An anecdote is related in Pierre's Studies of Nature:-“ The whole stock of a poor Arab of the desert consisted of a mare. The French consul offered to purchase her, in order to send her to his sovereign, Louis XIV. The Arab would have rejected the proposal at once with indignation and scorn, but he was miserably poor. He had no means of supplying his most urgent wants, or procuring the barest necessaries of life. Still he hesitated; he had scarcely a rag to cover him; and his wife and his children

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