Chronicles: The Writing of History in Medieval England

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A&C Black, Jan 1, 2004 - History - 292 pages
The priorities of medieval chroniclers and historians were not those of the modern historian, nor was the way that they gathered, arranged and presented evidence. Yet if we understand how they approached their task, and their assumption of God's immanence in the world, much that they wrote becomes clear. Many of them were men of high intelligence whose interpretation of events sheds clear light on what happened. Christopher Given-Wilson is one of the leading authorities on medieval English historical writing. He examines how medieval writers such as Ranulf Higden and Adam Usk treated chronology and geography, politics and warfare, heroes and villains. He looks at the ways in which chronicles were used during the middle ages, and at how the writing of history changed between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries.
 

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Contents

Telling the Truth
1
Godwitness Testimony
21
Memory and Usefulness
57
Genealogy and Institutional History
79
The Deeds of Warriors
99
Time and Place
113
Language Form and Identity
137
English History in the Later Middle Ages
153
Notes
215
Bibliography
263
Index
275
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Chris Given-Wilson is Professor of Late Mediaeval History at the University of St. Andrews.

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