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C.-LIST OF SCHOOLS, WITH ATTENDANCE, STAFFS, AND Cost OF MAINTENANCE

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D.-ANNUAL ENROLMENT, MULTIPLE ENROLMENTS, AND NET ANNUAL ENROLMENT

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TWENTY-SECOND REPORT OF THE SECRETARY FOR PUBLIC

INSTRUCTION IN QUEENSLAND, BEING THE REPORT FOR
THE YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 1897.

To His Excellency The Right Honourable CHARLES WALLACE ALEXANDER NAPIER,

Baron Lamington of Lamington, in the county of Lanark, in the Peerage
of the United Kingdom, Knight Commander of the Most Distinguished
Order of St. Michael and St. George, Governor and Commander-in-Chief
of the Colony of Queensland and its Dependencies.

MY LORD, I have the honour to submit to Your Excellency the Report of the Department of Public Instruction for the year 1897. .

Regulations.

GENERAL. 1. This Report with its Appendices deals with the educational work carried contents. on under the provisions of The State Education Act of 1875.” It also contains certain particulars respecting State aid to the following :- Secondary education in the form of grants to grammar schools, scholarships and bursaries to grammar schools, bursaries to the Agricultural College, and exhibitions to Universities; The Museum; and the Orphanages.

2. The Revised Regulations of the Department came into force on the 1st Revised July, 1897: As half the year had lapsed, the papers for the December examinations were set in accordance with the standards in force in 1896.

3. Up to the end of the year 1897 the remuneration of a head teacher in a Change in mode State school comprised two distinct items-namely, (a) “ salary" determined by his seche oorks in State classification as a teacher, and (6) “additional emoluments” according to the class of his school. From 1st January, 1898, the remuneration will be a single payment determined by the class of his school. The effect of this change will be to simplify the operations of the Department, to give uniform pay for the same work and responsibility, and to raise in most cases the income of the more poorly paid head teachers. No head teacher will suffer any diminution of income.

4. Under the financial stress of 1893 the special allowances, to which certain Special assistant teachers were entitled under Regulation 57, were reduced by one-third certain from 1st July, 1893. Of that reduction, one-half was restored from 1st July, 1896, teacheronder and the other half will be restored from 1st January, 1898.

5. The mode of awarding scholarships which had been in operation for the Change ting last three years gave little general satisfaction. On my recommendation the money voted Government approved of a change which is designed to secure these important scholarships. ends: that only children of ability above the ordinary should get scholarships; that the holder of a scholarship should be free to attend whatever school best suited his circumstances; that those living at a distance from a grammar school, and whose parents are unable through lack of means to board them from home, should get some additional help; and, lastly, that some encouragement should be given to students at the Agricultural College.

Accordingly, instead of granting 128 scholarships awarded at specified schools, as had been the practice, the money voted by Parliament for scholarships was made available for (a) 36 scholarships, entitling the holder to free education at any grammar school; (6) 8 bursaries, entitling the holders to free education at a grammar school and an allowance for board not exceeding £30 per annum; (c) 4 bursaries entitling the holders to free board and instruction as resident students at

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the Gatton Agricultural College. The scholarships and bursaries are tenable for
three years. The grammar school bursaries have been awarded to those candidates
only who must necessarily board away from home in order to attend a grammar
school, and whose parents have not the means to pay for their board. The Agri-
cultural College bursaries have been awarded to candidates between sixteen and
eighteen years of age who passed the examination and produced medical certificates
of sound constitution and good health.

6. The State Education Act Amendment Act of 1897,” recently passed, indvates v. gives power to add to the curriculum in the State schools, and Regulations are now

being prepared to give effect to the Act. It is proposed to extend the field of
instruction in the two highest classes, but mainly in the highest or sixth class, by
adding Euclid and algebra, a branch of science, the study of an English classic, and
a fuller course of English history.

7. Three new State schools were opened in 1897—namely, Apple-tree Creek
in the Isis Scrub, Mirani in the Mackay district, and Springside near Pittsworth.
Each of these superseded a provisional school. The State school at Redbank, which
was closed in 1891 on account of insufficient attendance, was reopened in September.
At the end of the year three more new State schools were ready to be opened-
namely, Jericho on the Central Railway, Mossman River to the north of Port
Douglas, and Sellheim near Charters Towers.

8. One unclassified State school-Copperfield, near Clermont-was closed on account of small attendance.

9. Thirty-one new provisional schools were opened during the year, situated as follow :- In Moreton District: Cross Roads, Durundur, Eudlo, Maleny ; in Darling Downs and Western Districts : Cooper's Creek, Domville, Dry Paddock, Eromanga, Kogan, Nobby, Paddock Swamp, Punch's Creek, Strathane, Wheatvale; in Wide Bay and Burnett Districts: Boolboonda, Imbil, Margoo, Miriam Vale, Pinbarren, Taabinga Village, Underban; in the Central Districts : Boundary, Coowonga, Gindie, Plane Creek, Proserpine Lower, Theresa Creek; in the Northern Districts : Ayton, Hughenden North, Mackinlay, and Mulgrave. In addition to these, provisional schools were reopened at Atherton and Nebo, the latter having formerly been a State school.

10. Four provisional schools were closed on account of insufficient attendance -namely, the schools at Horn Island in Torres Straits, Limestone near Maytown, Morinish near Rockhampton, and Tipton near Dalby.

11. Besides the numerous small repairs and additions to school furniture, important additions, repairs, and improvements were made at 116 existing State schools, involving an expenditure of £20,762 4s. 11d., of which £2,483 17s. 10d. was subscribed locally. Particulars respecting each of these works are given in Table I, appended to this Report.

12. The amount of accommodation in the State schools of the colony was in state schools, increased by 19,201 square feet during the year 1897. Of this increase 2,921 square

feet was furnished by new schools, and 16,280 square feet by additions to existing
schools. Allowing 8 square feet of floor space for each child, provision was made.
for an increase of 2,400 pupils. The actual increase in the average attendance at
the State schools was 4,592.

13. At the end of the year the total floor space in the State schools was in state schools. 481,677 square feet, exclusive of verandas; and allowing 8 square for each child,

the accommodation was enough for 60,209 pupils. The average attendance at those
schools for the year 1897 was 50,679.

14. Thirty applications for the establishment of new State schools were
received and dealt with. At the end of the year 20 of these applications had been
approved, and preliminary action taken ; 5 applications were not approved; and, in
the case of the other 5, action was postponed pending further information. Par-
ticulars respecting each of these applications are given in Table H, appended to this
Report,

Provisional schools closed.

Additions to
State schools.

Increase in accommodation

Total accommodation

State schools applied for.

schools applied

15. Seventy-nine applications for the establishment of new provisional schools Provisional were received and dealt with. At the end of the year 39 of these applications had for. been approved and preliminary action taken to establish the schools; 9 of the applications were not approved, and 31 were in abeyance pending further information. The action taken with regard to each of these applications is specified in Table H, appended to this Report.

SCHOOLS IN OPERATION IN 1897. 16. At the end of the year there were in operation 791 schools, comprising Number of 388 State, 399 provisional, and 4 special schools. The last include the Reformatory end of the yeur. school for boys at Lytton, and the schools for aboriginals at Myora, near Dunwich, Deebing Creek, near Ipswich, and Murray Island in Torres Straits. There was a net increase of 28 schools for the year.

17. The total number of schools open during some part of the year was 797. During the year.

18. The tabular statement below shows the classification of the schools open Classification of at the end of the year, and compares it with that of the previous year :

schools.

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At 67 of the provisional schools the average attendance was sufficient to warrant the establishment of a State school.

19. Five pairs of half-time schools were in operation during the year hetimo namely, Pikedale No. 1 and No. 2, Nellybri with Retreat, Cooper's Creek with Windorah, Maleny with Blackall Range, and Underban with Margoo.

20. Tables A, B, and C, appended to this Report, give full particulars respecting the schools in operation during the year 1897.

ATTENDANCE OF CHILDREN. 21. For 1897 the gross enrolment was 80,710 in the State and 14,318 in the Enrolment. provisional schools making a total of 95,028. The net enrolment (or number of distinct children on the rolls) was 85,229, showing an increase of 3,475 on the net enrolment for 1896.

22. The average daily attendance was 50,679 in the State and 9,069 in the averago daily provisional schools-total 79,748, showing an increase of 5,432 on the average daily attendance for 1896.

23. The annual returns from head teachers for the year 1897 show a total of Neglected 1,637 children (935 boys and 702 girls) between the ages of six and fifteen, who, though living within reach of a school, are not educated up to the standard of education, and are not attending any school. Of these, 878 are between the ages of six and twelve, and 760 are over twelve. The total number of neglected children so reported is less by 66 than it was in 1896.

24. The number of children reported as not attending school the minimum Partially number of days required by the Education Act—that is to say, 60 in the half-year— clareal was 9,422 in the half-year ending June, and 7,968 in the half-year ending December. Comparing these numbers with the corresponding ones for 1896 we find a decrease of 388 defaulters in the first half-year, and 652 in the second half-year.

attendance.

children.

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