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IN THE
SPANISH LANGUAGE,

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH;
WITH EXPLANATORY ILLUSTRATIONS

FROM THE
LATIN, SPANISH, AND ENGLISH AUTHORS.

BY JOHN COLLINS,

“ PARECeme, SANCHO, QUE NO HAY REFRAX QUE NO

SEA VERDADERO, PORQUE TODOS SON SENTENCIAS
SACADAS DE LA MISMA ESPERIENCIA, MADRE DE LAS

CIENCIAS TODAS.”
“ I am of opinion, Sancho, that there is no Proverb which

is not true, because they are all sentences drauon from
experience itself, the Mother of all the Sciences.

Don Quixote, Part 1, Cap. 21.

LONDON:
Printed by S. Brooke, 35, Paternoster-Roro,

AND SOLD BY
G. AND W, B, WHITTAKER, AVE-MARIA LANE,

LUDGATE STREET.

1823.

AUTHOR'S PREFACE.

SPANISH Proverbs have been long celebrated for their pith and humour. The Spaniards entertain so high an opinion of their merit, that they consider the knowledge of them, and a readiness at introducing them into conversation, as proofs of talent and acuteness.

The following collection was formed at intervals of leisure from my mercantile pursuits, during several years residence in Spain. I had often thought that a publication of them in England, in their present arrangement, would be useful as well as entertaining. The great interest which the late political affairs of that country have excited, has induced me to carry this design into effect. To be conversant in the Spanish language is now considered a literary and a fashionable attainment; it has, in fact, become a necessary study to the British: merchant trading with the Spaniards, from the recent increase of our commercial intercourse with those extensive regions where it is universally spoken.

I have paid particular attention to the correctness of the Spanish. The orthography is conformable to the last Edition of the Dictionary, published by the Royal Academy at Madrid. The translations. I have endeavoured to keep as literal as possible. This will enable the learner of the Spanish to improve himself, and not be without its advantages to Spaniards who study our language. The illustrations which follow, are introduced when the translation does not thoroughly convey the bearing and application of the Proverb. The Latin quotations, I trust, will not be thought inapplicable: they were added with a view to a further illustration of the sentiment conveyed by the adage, and not for any purpose of displaying the Author's erudition. The Spaniard will here find the trite and significant aphorisms of his language not only translated, but exemplified by passages from classical and other authors, and he will observe that I have not, altogether, forgotten those of his own country.

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-I present, therefore, this trifle to the world, with the hope that it may not be deficient in usefulness to Spaniards as well as my own countrymen; and have only further to observe, that I trust it will be found as free from errors as most of the publications of a similar description, and thereby prove worthy of the attention and patronage of the admirers of Spanish wit and humour.

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DICTIONARY

SPANISH PROVERBS, &c.

BAD avariento por un bodigo pierde ciento.
« The covetous abbot for one loaf loses a huno,
dred.”—Avarice commonly occasions injury to

the person who is governed by its influence. Ábad de bamba lo que no puede comer, dalo por

su almą.-" The imprudent abbot, who gives for the good of his soul, what he cannot eat." A taunt upon those who only giye away what

they cannot make use of themselves. Aballa pastor, las espaldas al sol.Shepherd,

turn the backs of your flock to the sun.”-In Spain it is considered injurious to the sheep to

graze with their heads towards the sun. A barba muerta, poca verguenza." Little respect

is paid to the dead.”—The greatest of the dead may be insulted by the basest of the living.

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