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CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

PAGE Description of the Territory.--Its boundaries-rivers--prairies woodlands--soil-climate appearance

and general characteristics

15

CHAPTER II.

Discovery and early exploration of Kansas.--The Indians of the Ter

ritory.-Their reserves.-The Shawnee Mission

18

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CHAPTER III.

Application of Missouri for admission into the Union. The restriction and compromise bills of 1818–19-20.-Debates on the KansasNebraska Bill.The Organic Act of Kansas Territory

24

CHAPTER IV.

The organic act a compromise measure.-Kansas intended for a slave

state.-Conduct of the pro-slavery party.- Persecutions of froestate people.--New England Emigrant aid Societies. Public meetings.-Blue Lodges.-Invasion from Westport.-Arrival of Governor Reeder.---Judges of the Supreme Court

27

CHAPTER V.

Elections.-Gen. Whitfield's politics.--Meetings in Missouri to control

the Kansas elections.-The Missouri press.-The Lynching of William Phillips. Outrages upon the free-state citizens approved. Destruction of the “Parkeville Luminary" 1 *

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33 CHAPTER VI.

PAGE

Census returns, February, 1855.--The election of March 30th.--The

Legislative Assembly

38

CHAPTER VII.

Reinoval of Governor Reeder.-Secretary Woodson.-Assumption of

power by the Legislature.-Office-holders all pro-slavery mon.Free-state mass meetings and conventions.--Elections for delegate to Congress.-Free-state Constitution adopted.--Dr. Charles Robinson elected governor.-Meetings of the State Legislature.-Arrost of Robinson and others for high treason.—The Topeka Legislature dispersed by Col. Sumner

41

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The Kansas Legion.—Patrick Laughlin.—The murder of Collins. Outrages upon J. W. B. Kelley.- Rev. Pardee Butler set adrift in the Missouri River on a raft.-Disputes about land claims.--The murder of Dow.Portrait of Sheriff Jones. Arrest and rescue of Jacob Branson .

47

CHAPTER IX.

Governor Wilson Shannon.-Consequences of the arrest and rescue

of Branson.—Meeting at Lawrence.--Military organization for defonce.-Sheriff Jones requires three thousand men.-The governor orders out the militia.--A general call to arms.--The governor issues a proclamation.- War excitement in Missouri.-The invading army.--Governor Shannon's excuse

53

CHAPTER X.

The governor calls upon Colonel Sumner for United States troops.

Proposition for the Lawrence people to surrender their arms.-The governor makes a treaty with the free-state generals.—Dispersion of the militia

59

CHAPTER XI.

The murder of Thomas W. Barber

65

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CHAPTER XII.

Pro-slavery mob at Leavenworth.--Ballot-box stolen and clerk beaten.

-The jail and printing office destroyed.-The election and fight near Easton.-Murder of Captain E. P. Brown.-Shannon receives authority to employ the troops.--Congressional Committee.--Arrival of Buford and his southern regiment.-Sheriff Jones shot at Lawrence.—Rev. Pardee Butler tarred and feathered

70

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Charge of Judge Lecompte to the Grand Jury.- Presentment.---Ar

resis at Lawrence.---Travellers interrupted on the highways.—The murder of Jones and Stewart.---The sacking of Lawrence.-Burning of the hotel and destruction of printing offices

77

CHAPTER XIV.

Murderous assault on a pro-slavery company.--Captain John Brown.

---The Potawattomie murders... Outrages of Captain Pate at Osawattomie.-Battle of Palmyra.--Fight at Franklin.-General Whitfield's army.-Colonel Sumner disperses the contending armies.-Murder of Cantral.--Sacking of Osawattomie.-The murder of Gay, an Indian agent.--Outrages at Leavenworth and on the Missouri River. 86

CHAPTER XV.

Removal of Colonel Sumner and appointment of General P. F. Smith.

--Free-state refugees driven from Fort Leavenworth.--Immigration from the North.-Destruction of pro-slavery forts by free-state bands.--Murder of Major Hoyt.-Defeat of the pro-slavery forces at Franklin.—Colonel Titus captured by Captain Walker, and his house burned.-Alarm at Lecompton.--Governor Shannon makes another treaty with the Lawrence people

92

CHAPTER XVI.

Atchison and Stringfellow call on Missourians for assistance.—Mr.

Hoppe and a teamster scalped.-A German murdered at Leavenworth. Outrages upon a young female.--Shannon removed, and Woodson acting-governor.--Atchison concentrates an army at Little Santa Fe. General L. A. Maclean his commissary.--He robs the settlers and the United States mails.-Reid attacks Brown at Osawattomie, who retreats and the town is sacked and destroyed. Murder of Frederick Brown and insanity of his brother Job.me Lane drives Atchison into Missouri.--Outrages at the Quaker Mission.-Burning of free-state houses.--Lane threatens Lecompton.Dead bodies found and buried.—Captain Emory murders Phillips, and drives free-state residents from Leavenworth

97

CHAPTER XVII.

Appointment of Governor Geary.--His departure for Kansas.--Arrival at Jefferson City.-Interviews with Governor Price.--Removal of obstructions on the Missouri River.—Departure on steamboat Keystone.-Scenes at Glasgow.--Captain Jackson's Missouri volunteers. -- What Reeder did.- Arrival at Kansas City.—Description of Border Ruffians.--Who comprise the Abolitionists.-Appearance and condition of Leavenworth City

103 CHAPTER XVIII.

PAGE Arrival at Fort Leavenworth.-General P. F. Smith.-Free-state men

driven from Leavenworth City.-Pressed horses.--John D. Henderpon.-Violation of the United States safeguard.- Arrest of Captain Emory...Character of his company.-Governor Geary's letter to Col. Clarkson.~Rev. Mr. Nute.- District Attorney Isacks

109

CHAPTER XIX.

Fort Leavenworth.-Departure for Lecompton.--Barricade at Leaven

worth City.--Excuse for Border Ruffian outrages.-Terror of James H. Lade.—Hair breadth escapes.—Anecdotes of the times.-Robbery at Alexandria.- A chase and race. The robbers overtaken.- Arrival at Lecompton.-Letter to the Secretary of State.—Two men shot at Lecompton

114

CHAPTER XX.

The town of Lecompton.---Its location and moral character.—The ac

counts of their grievances by the pro-slavery party.-Policy indicated by that party for Governor Geary. The Inaugural address. Proclamations ordering the dispersion of armed bodies, and for organizing the militia of the territory

122

CHAPTER XXI.

Gloomy prospect for Governor Geary's administration. Determination

to make Kansas a slave state.--Opposition to the new governor. Address to the people of the slave states.--Secretary Woodson's proclamation

127

CHAPTER XXII.

The Missouri army.-Orders to the adjutant and inspector-generals of

the territory.-Dispatch to Secretary Marcy.-Dispatches from General Heiskell.--Message from the governor's special agent. Requisition for troops.- Visit of the governor to Lawrence, and return to Lecompton

133

CHAPTER XXIII.

Excitement at Lecompton.--Affidavit of W. F. Dyer.-Requisition for

troops.-The battle at Hickory Point.--Arrest of one hundred and one frec-state prisoners. The killing of Grayson, a pro-slavery man. Treatment of the prisoners.--Conduct of Judges Lecompte and Cato. Trial and sentence of the prisoners, and their subsequent treat

139

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The Missouri army of invasion. Letter from Theodore Adams.-GO

vernor Geary proceeds with troops to Lawrence, and protects the town. The governor visits the camp of the Missourians, addresses the officers, and disbands the force

148

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CHAPTER XXV.

Improved condition of things.--Attempt to resurrect the courts and

incite the judges to the performance of their duty.--Judges Burrell, Cato and Lecompte.-The examination and trial of free-state prisoners.--Directions to Judge Cato.--Letters to the Supreme Judges.--Replies of Judges Cato and Lecompte.—Great criminals permitted to run at liberty.—Discharge of free-state men on bail. --Judge Locompte's defence

157

CHAPTER XXVI.

The murder of Buffum.-Warrant for the arrest of the murderer.

Partial conduct of the marshals.-Reward offered. --Indignation of free-state citizens.- Arrest of Charles Hays

166

CHAPTER XXVII.

Discharge of Hays by Judge Lecompte.-Order for his re-arrest.--Con

duct of Marshal Donalson.--Col. Titus re-arrests Hays, who is again set at liberty by Lecompte on a writ of habeas corpus.--President Pierce and the United States Senate on the case of Lecompte.--Letter from Secretary Marcy asking explanations.-Governor Geary's reply.-Judge Locompte's letter of vindication

172

CHAPTER XXVIII.

The United States Marshal.---His deputies.--Requisitions for United

States soldiers.--Visit of the governor to Topeka, and arrest of prisoners.-An address to the citizens of Topeka.—Report of the marshal.--Requisition declined, and an evil practice discontinued 181

CHAPTER XXIX.

Arrival of free-state immigrants, and their treatment and discharge

187

CHAPTER XXX.

Peace and quiet prevailing.- Visit to Lawrence.Proclamation of the

Mayor of Leavenworth.-Suspension of the liquor traffic in Lecompton.--Organization of militia.-Escort for wagons furnished.--Another election

192

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