Report of the proceedings and speeches at the great public meeting ... 26th June, 1849

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Page 24 - For who, to dumb Forgetfulness a prey, This pleasing anxious being e'er resigned, Left the warm precincts of the cheerful day, Nor cast one longing lingering look behind?
Page 4 - ... is good sense defaced: Some are bewilder'd in the maze of schools, And some made coxcombs Nature meant but fools. In search of wit these lose their common sense, And then turn critics...
Page 22 - So far from its having suppressed the traliic, or promised to suppress it, it was concluded by the Parliamentary Committee of Inquiry, that, although the squadron was in the very highest state of efficiency and discipline, the trade was " now conducted with an amount of organization, and with a degree of confidence in the success of its adventures, such as has never before been opposed to the efforts of the nations engaged in suppressing it.
Page 22 - ... in the markets of Europe. " 9. That the admission of slave-grown sugar to consumption in this country has tended, by greatly increasing the demand for that description of produce, so to stimulate the African slave-trade, as to render an effectual check more difficult of attainment than at any former period. " 10. That the sufferings and mortality of the slaves in the barracoons and in the middle passage are appalling to humanity, and the intensity of the sufferings, and the amount of the mortality,...
Page 16 - ... independent of foreign supply. Let the bread we eat be the produce of corn grown among ourselves, and, for one, I care not how cheap it is ; the cheaper the better.
Page 22 - The report of 1848 declares : " That many estates in the British "West India colonies have been already abandoned, that many more are in the course of abandonment, and that from this cause a very serious diminution is to be apprehended in the total amount of production. That the first effect of this diminution will be an increase in the price of sugar, and the ultimate effect a greater extension to the growth of sugar in slave countries, and a greater impetus to slavery and the slave-trade.
Page 22 - ... 8. That the extent and activity of the African slave-trade, though in some degree affected by foreign interference, and at times restrained by the exertions of the Governments of Cuba and Brazil, have been mainly governed by the demand for the products of slave-labour in the markets of Europe. " 9. That the admission of slave-grown sugar to consumption in this country has tended, by greatly increasing the demand for that description of produce, so to stimulate the African...
Page 33 - Gramineae" — the last of the natural orders elaborated for the "Genera Plantarum": — " Much has been done, however, for the elucidation of the order in local Floras. Already at the close of the last century and the commencement of the present...
Page 22 - ... this country has tended, by greatly increasing the demand for that description of produce, so to stimulate the African slave-trade, as to render an effectual check more difficult of attainment than at any former period. 10. That the sufferings and mortality of slaves in the barracoons and in the middle passage are appalling to humanity, and the intensity of the sufferings, and the amount of the mortality, are unexampled in the history of the slave-trade.
Page 12 - He hoped the time would never come when the free-trade theory would be consummated ; "but should it please God in His anger that it should be effected, then would this great kingdom soon return to its normal and natural state — a weather-beaten island in a northern sea.

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