The Works of Lord Morley, Volume 5

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1921

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Page 15 - Not that I speak in respect of want: for I have learned, in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content. I know both how to be abased, and I know how to abound: every where and in all things I am instructed both to be full and to be hungry, both to abound and to suffer need.
Page 427 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in Covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will, come to Thee, for Thy People. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service...
Page 426 - Park ; and before I came to him, as he rode at the head of his life-guard, I saw and felt a waft of death go forth against him : and when I came to him he looked like a dead man.
Page 144 - Sir, the State, in choosing men to serve it, takes no notice of their opinions ; if they be willing faithfully to serve it, — that satisfies.
Page 292 - He was a strong man," so intimates Charles Harvey, who knew him: "in the dark perils of war, in the high places of the field, hope shone in him like a pillar of fire, when it had gone out in all the others.
Page 109 - I did this somewhat, impute it to what you please: I raised such men as had the fear of God before them, as made some conscience of what they did, and from that day forward, I must say to you, they were never beaten, and wherever they were engaged against the enemy they beat continually.
Page 432 - Your pretended fear lest Error should step in, is like the man who would keep all the wine out of the country lest men should be drunk. It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy, to deprive a man of his natural liberty upon a supposition he may abuse it. When he doth abuse it, judge.
Page 207 - I think that the poorest he that is in England hath a life to live, as the greatest he; and therefore truly, sir, I think it's clear, that every man that is to live under a government ought first by his own consent to put himself under that government...
Page 367 - The mind is the man. If that be kept pure, a man signifies somewhat ; if not, I would very fain see what difference there is betwixt him and a beast. He hath only some activity to do some more mischief.
Page 23 - Kiss the Son, lest he be angry, and ye perish from the way, when his wrath is kindled but a little. Blessed are all they that put their trust in him.

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