An Essay on the Archaeology of Our Popular Phrases, and Nursery Rhymes, Volume 2

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, Green & Company, 1837 - English language

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Popular passages

Page 148 - First, Moloch, horrid King, besmeared with blood Of human sacrifice, and parents' tears; Though, for the noise of drums and timbrels loud, Their children's cries unheard that passed through fire To his grim idol.
Page 140 - A man may see how this world goes with no eyes. Look with thine ears. See how yond justice rails upon yond simple thief. Hark in thine ear: change places and, handy-dandy, which is the justice, which is the thief?
Page 42 - Now the wasted brands do glow, Whilst the screech-owl, screeching loud, Puts the wretch that lies in woe In remembrance of a shroud. Now it is the time of night That the graves all gaping wide, Every one lets forth his sprite, In the church-way paths to glide.
Page 148 - Lies perdue in a nook or gloomy cave, Prompt to enchant some inadvertent wretch With his unhallow'd touch. So (poets sing) Grimalkin, to domestic vermin sworn An everlasting foe, with watchful eye Lies nightly brooding o'er a chinky gap, Protending her fell claws, to thoughtless mice Sure ruin.
Page 120 - The Queen of Night, whose large command Rules all the sea, and half the land, And over moist and crazy brains, In high spring-tides, at midnight reigns, Was now declining to the west, To go to bed and take her rest...
Page 30 - ... I suspect, so called from the tubular-shape into which they are rolled. Though Lord Bacon explains the ground of the name given to that office in another way, and as follows : — That office of her Majesty's Exchequer, we, by a metaphor, call the pipe, because the whole receipt is finally conveyed into it by the means of divers small pipes or quills, as water into a cistern.
Page 216 - As the strong eagle in the silent wood, Mindless of warlike rage and hostile care, Plays round the rocky cliff or crystal flood, Till by Jove's high behests call'd out to war, And charg'd with thunder of his angry king, His bosom with the vengeful message glows ; Upward the noble bird directs his wing, And...
Page 186 - AY me ! what perils do environ The man that meddles with cold iron \ What plaguy mischiefs and mishaps Do dog him still with after-claps ! For though dame Fortune seem to smile. And leer upon him, for a while, She'll after show him, in the nick Of all his glories, a dog-trick. This any man may sing or say I' th
Page 258 - He relates it only by parcels, and won't give us the whole ; which forces me to bespeak his friends to engage him to lay aside that stingy humour, and gra* tify the publick at once.
Page 30 - The veins unfill'd, our blood is cold, and then We pout upon the morning, are unapt To give or to forgive : but when we have stuffd These pipes, and these conveyances of blood With wine and feeding, we have suppler souls...

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