The Beauties of England and Wales: Or Delineations, Topographical, Historical, and Descriptive, of Each County

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 296 - Consult the Genius of the Place in all; That tells the Waters or to rise, or fall; Or helps th...
Page 385 - Grown all to all, from no one vice exempt; And most contemptible, to shun contempt; His passion still to covet gen'ral praise, His life, to forfeit it a thousand ways; A constant bounty which no friend has made; An angel tongue which no man can persuade; A fool, with more of wit than half mankind...
Page 51 - Yet within three days shall Pharaoh lift up thy head from off thee, and shall hang thee on a tree; and the birds shall eat thy flesh from off thee.
Page 180 - There, interspers'd in lawns and opening glades, Thin trees arise that shun each other's shades. Here in full light the russet plains extend : There wrapt in clouds the bluish hills ascend. E'en the wild heath displays her purple dyes, And 'midst the desert fruitful fields arise, That crown'd with tufted trees and springing corn, Like verdant isles, the sable waste adorn.
Page 66 - Sidney's sister, Pembroke's mother. Death, ere thou hast slain another Fair and learn'd and good as she, Time shall throw a dart at thee.
Page 201 - Here hills and vales, the woodland and the plain, Here earth and water seem to strive again ; Not chaos-like together crush'd and bruis'd, But, as the world, harmoniously confus'd : Where order in variety we see, And where, though all things differ, all agree.
Page 312 - Statesman, yet friend to truth ! of soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honour clear ! Who broke no promise, serv'd no private end, Who gain'd no title, and who lost no friend ; Ennobled by himself, by all approv'd, Prais'd, wept, and honour'd, by the Muse he lov'd.
Page 296 - And you, brave COBHAM ! to the latest breath, Shall feel your ruling passion strong in death : Such in those moments as in all the past ; " Oh, save my country, Heaven !
Page 388 - In the worst inn's worst room, with mat half-hung, The floors of plaster, and the walls of dung, On once a flock-bed, but repair'd with straw, With tape-tied curtains, never meant to draw, The George and Garter dangling from that bed Where tawdry yellow strove with dirty red, Great Villiers lies — alas!
Page 356 - I am persuaded his power and interest at that time were greater to do good or hurt than any man's in the kingdom, or than any man of his rank hath had in any time; for his reputation of honesty was universal, and his affections seemed so publicly guided, that no corrupt or private ends could bias...

Bibliographic information