The Life of Charles Stewart Parnell, 1846-1891, Volume 1

Front Cover
Smith, Elder & Company, 1899 - Ireland
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 35 - THERE is not in the wide world a valley so sweet, As that vale in whose bosom the bright waters meet ; Oh ! the last rays of feeling and life must depart, Ere the bloom of that valley shall fade from my heart.
Page 35 - Twas that friends, the beloved of my bosom, were near, Who made every dear scene of enchantment more dear, And who felt how the best charms of Nature improve When we see them reflected from looks that we love. Sweet vale of Avoca ! how calm could I rest In thy bosom of shade, with the friends I love best, Where the storms that we feel in this cold world should cease, And our hearts, like thy waters, be mingled in peace.
Page 6 - scape from flattery to wit. Absent or dead, still let a friend be dear, (A sigh the absent claims, the dead a tear,) Recall those nights that clos'd thy toilsome days, Still hear thy Parnell in his living lays...
Page 66 - To leave to an Imperial parliament the power of dealing with all questions affecting the Imperial Crown and Government, legislation regarding the colonies and other dependencies of the Crown, the relations of the United Empire with foreign states, and all matters appertaining to the defence and the stability of the empire at large.
Page 59 - ... to embrace in a manner foreign to their habits in other times the vast importance of the Irish controversy.
Page 3 - ... worth so much money before; but perhaps you are not sensible of this, who give away your own works. You are a generous author; I a hackney scribbler: you...
Page 6 - For him, thou oft hast bid the world attend, Fond to forget the statesman in the friend ; For SWIFT and him, despised the farce of state, • The sober follies of the wise and great ; Dext'rous, the craving, fawning crowd to quit, And pleased to 'scape from Flattery to Wit.
Page 58 - In my opinion, and in the opinion of many with whom I communicated, the Fenian conspiracy has had an important influence with respect to Irish policy ; but it has not been an influence in determining, or in affecting in the slightest degree, the convictions which we have entertained with respect to the course proper to be pursued in Ireland. The influence of Fenianism was this — that when the Habeas Corpus Act was suspended, when all the consequent proceedings occurred, when the overflow of...
Page 237 - Coventry, by isolating him from his kind as if he was a leper of old — you must show him your detestation of the crime he has committed, and you may depend upon it that there will be no man so full of avarice, so lost to shame, as to dare the public opinion of all right-thinking men and to transgress your unwritten code of laws.
Page 349 - A surrender is bad, but a compromise or arrangement is worse. I think we may remember what a Tudor king said to a great Irishman in former times : " If all Ireland cannot govern the Earl of Kildare, then let the Earl of Kildare govern all Ireland.

Bibliographic information