London, Volumes 5-6

Front Cover
Charles Knight
Charles Knight & Company, 1851 - London (England)
 

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Contents

Vehicular Placards
39
THE EAST INDIA HOUSE
49
St Giless Cripplegate partially burnt in
52
The Carnivora Terrace
57
2
61
Interior of Guildhall
65
Anne Askew apprehended again and committed Throckmorton charged with having devised
68
Marriage of Queen Mary and Philip of Spain Hendlip House used as a place of concealment
78
CIVIC GOVERNMENT
81
Crypt below the Hall
84
Monuments of great Men in Guildhall
92
The Mansion House 1771
96
THE COMPANIES OF LONDON J SAUNDERS
106
34
110
Companies of London now in their Decline 114 ment
114
Richard Whittington
120
39
125
amage done to Covent Garden Church by Fire Act passed for the establishment of Portman
131
Potatosalesmen in London
144
The Lower School at Greenwich
155
THE CHURCHES OF LONDON No II
161
Introduction of the Lilactree about the middle One of the earliest attempts to supply Plants
163
Eminent Persons buried in the Church of
166
Fire
178
St Lukes Old Street erected by James in 1732 198 Interior of St Pancras
204
THE HORSE GUARDS
209
The British Soldier of the present
214
Position of the Citizens of London after the Miles Coverdale Rector of St Magnus till 1566
227
Pepyss ineffectual endeavours to comprehend
229
Jacob Tonson and Bernard Lintott immortalized
238
EXETER HALL
241
Death of Sir Samuel Romilly in 1818 217 Speakers at the May Meetings in Exeter Hall
248
Anniversary Meetings held at Exeter Hall 250 1804 233
254
Gambols of the Monkeys
266
THE GARDENS OF THE ZOOLOGICAL SOCIETY J SAUNDERS
273
Old Stage Directions
279
The Royal Treasury of England manufactured
289
The Treasury from St Jamess Park 1775
304
THE TREASURY W Weir
305
Kensington Gardens commenced by William
316
Average of Burglaries fewer in London than
322
394
333
The Fruit Tent
335
LONDON NEWSPAPERS
337
Innumerable Specimens of all the finest flower
353
Characteristics of Barry
359
30
367
Expenditure on the Zoological Gardens from
368
MEDICAL AND SURGICA HOSPITALS
369
Irr portance of the Great London Hospitals
376
LONDON SHOPS AND BAZA
384
The Shops of London in themselves a very
385
Bakers Shops in London
391
321
403
Abandonment of his Scheme by Sir R Walpole
407
165
407
231
407
321
407
EDUCATION IN LONDON ANCIENT
1
Augustin the presumed Founder of the Schools
2
Contrasts between the seven Boroughs of
3
Perambulating Hat
7
Dislike entertained towards Dean Colet by
8
The Dame Schools of London
17
Extract from the Records of the Tower relating
19
Excise Office Broad Street
20
THE OLD JEWRY
33
Immigration of Jews into England under William
36
The Jews of Amsterdam invited by Cromwell
42
ILLUSTRATIONS
48
Burrys PicturesElysium or the State of Final Retribution
86
Seene in Guildhall on the 24th of June 1483 68 Anne Askew favourably noticed by the Queen
87
138
88
Old Shop corner of Fleet Street and Chancery Lane in 1799
91
Death of Camden in 1623
93
History of the Lord Mayors of London four
94
neral Philanthropy of modern times
96
99
99
House in Silver Street belonging to the Neville
105
Portions of the Panathenaic Frieze preserved in Sir William Hamiltons Miscellaneous Collection
110
Residences of the Bishops in the City
111
BUCKINGHAM AND OLD WESTMINSTER
113
Contrast between Buckingham Palace and
123
Books sold to any extent in London
124
WESTMINSTER HALL AND THE
129
130
130
No Book Shops in London till after the Four Pepyss Visits to the Booksellers Shops in
131
Covent Garden formed into a Parish in 1645 132
132
Plans for the Decoration of those parts of
136
ILLUSTRATIONS
138
142
142
263
144
THE LORD MAYORS SHOW
145
Services rendered to Horticulture since the esta
147
Chariots and Horsemen on the Northern Pana Torso of Venus and Statue of Cupid in the Town
173
MUSIC
177
Person sent from the Pope in 678 to teach Music Performance of Handels Oratorios at Covent
179
mary by the Father of Chaucer
180
188
188
Rise of Concerts in the reign of Charles II
190
THE SQUARES OF LONDON
193
ne City Squa
195
The appearance of the Jews in England towards
202
Situation and Boundaries of the Borough
227
182
237
THE NATIONAL GALLERY AND
241
Merchant Tailors School Cannon Street
243
Royal Proclamation against Vice issued in 1787 214 1808
245
Characters of the three Carracci
250
Rubenss Discovery of the genius of Vandyke 251 The Soane Museum
256
London in 1560
262
264
264
Borough of Finsbury
271
The Adelphi Theatre
274
279
279
Establishment of the Shakspere Gallery by
280
Birds Death of Ell
287
200
292
Risk incurred by Members of the Stock Exchange 298 and Rapallo in October 1841
304
ILLUSTRATIONS
307
Objects of the Founders of the Horticultural
309
The Great Western Railway
315
Covent Garden Theatre
319
Moorfields Seven Centuries ago
321
324
324
Engagement between the London Citizens
327
Antwerp the Centre of the Money Power of Plan proposed by Mr Pitt for raising the Loan
329
104
332
THE EAST INDIA HOUSE
334
340
340
Fast
341
Objects to which the Endowments of the City School for the Indigent Blind
347
TATTERSALLS
353
354
354
Highflyer the foundation of Richard Tattersalls
360
Highflyer not to be Sold
368
Persons who have received the Pensions and Outline of the original views of the Royal Society 378
378
Lord Thurlow
391
Lord Stoweli
397

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Page 242 - Thames' waters flow. O what a multitude they seem'd, these flowers of London town! Seated in companies they sit with radiance all their own. The hum of multitudes was there, but multitudes of lambs, Thousands of little boys & girls raising their innocent hands.
Page 242 - TWAS on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean, The children walking two and two, in red and blue and green, Grey-headed beadles walk'd before, with wands as white as snow, Till into the high dome of Paul's they like Thames
Page 10 - ... not to the clergy, not to the bishop, not to the chapter, nor to any great minister at court ; but amongst the married laymen, to the Company of Mercers, men of probity and reputation. And when he was asked the reason of so committing...
Page 276 - Nay, their endeavour keeps in the wonted pace : but there is, sir, an aiery of children, little eyases, that cry out on the top of question, and are most tyrannically clapped for't: these are now the fashion ; and so berattle the common stages (so they call them), that many, wearing rapiers, are afraid of goose-quills, and dare scarce come thither.
Page 85 - A lucid mirror, in which Nature sees All her reflected features. Bacon there Gives more than female beauty to a stone, And Chatham's eloquence to marble lips.
Page 50 - ... the black faces, the long beards, the yellow streaks of sect, the turbans and the flowing robes, the spears and the silver maces, the elephants with their canopies of state, the gorgeous palanquin of the prince, and the close litter of the noble lady...
Page 230 - Britain was a plentiful and perpetual emporium of learned authors ; and men went thither as to a market. This drew to the place a mighty trade ; the rather because the shops were spacious, and the learned gladly resorted to them, where they seldom failed to meet with agreeable conversation. And the booksellers themselves were knowing and conversible men, with whom, for the sake of bookish knowledge, the greatest wits were pleased to converse.
Page 278 - This was the fatal period of that virtuous fabric, wherein yet nothing did perish but wood and straw, and a few forsaken cloaks; only one man had his breeches set on fire, that would perhaps have broiled him, if he had not by the benefit of a provident wit put it out with bottle ale.
Page 278 - The king's players had a new play, called ' All is True? representing some principal pieces of the reign of Henry the Eighth, which was set forth with many extraordinary circumstances of pomp and majesty, even to the matting of the stage; the knights of the order, with their Georges and Garter, the guards with their embroidered coats, and the like; sufficient, in truth, within a...
Page 104 - Robert had heard them all he assured them that he was conscious of having meant well ; that in the present inflamed temper of the people the act could not be carried into execution without an armed force...

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