Mapping the Diversity of Nature

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R.I. Miller
Springer Science & Business Media, Jul 31, 1994 - Nature - 218 pages
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The diversity of life is displayed by a diversity the biodiversity elements. These unique of structural and functional elements. Many approaches are usually tailored to the region of aspects of this diversity are critical for main the world where the scientists' work is focused. taining the healthy functioning of biological This book presents accounts of many tech systems both within short and long time scales. niques that are currently being used in different Some highly diverse features of nature arise parts of the globe by conservation scientists. simply from the heterogeneous patterns that Many different techniques are necessary to comprise the web of nature. Many of these handle the differences in data types and data features contribute to the beauty and quality of coverages that occur across the globe. Also, a life. Humans do not yet understand enough variety of mapping approaches are needed about the complexity of nature to distinguish today to strengthen the many diverse critical those elements that act to support natural conservation objectives. These objectives include vitality from those elements that contribute the identification of the distribution patterns exclusively to our experience of beauty and for a species or habitat type and the placement quality in life. of protected area boundaries.
 

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Contents

Setting the scene
3
12 Natural features data
4
122 Data processing
6
13 The labyrinth of scale
7
14 Species mapping
8
142 Species habitats
9
15 Applications of satellite data to natural features mapping
11
153 Some new applications of satellite imagery
12
Monitoring large elephant herds in Kenya
117
74 Conclusions
121
75 Future prospects of the AED
122
752 Database requirements and development strategy
123
Acknowledgements
124
Designing protected areas for giant pandas in China
127
82 Traditional view of the problem
129
83 Factors threatening the giant panda
130

17 Using databases and maps in biodiversity conservation
13
172 Some recent mapping approaches
15
A Medley of Contexts for Mapping Species Data
19
Mapping for monographs Baselines for resource development
21
22 Assembling the primary data set
22
222 Taxonomic literature
23
224 Ecological literature
24
231 Terrain
25
242 Map interpretation
26
25 Conservation significance of the interpreted maps
31
26 Conclusions
32
27 Summary
33
References
34
Mapping the elements of biodiversity The rare species of Madagascar
37
32 The approach
38
322 An overview of the methodological approach
39
323 Country selection
40
327 Interpretation of the field observations
42
33 Species distribution maps
47
34 Evaluation and recommendations
49
Acknowledgements
50
Modeling vertebrate distributions for Gap Analysis
53
42 Methods
54
Countyvegetation
55
423 Complex models
56
An example
64
442 Assumptions and limitations
67
45 Summary
68
A Conceptual Context for Biodiversity Mapping
69
Hierarchical representations of species distributions using maps images and sighting data
71
52 Conceptual background
72
522 Biodiversity data sets and the database hypercube
73
53 Analysis and visualization of the orangethroated whiptail distribution
76
Predicting species range limits
77
534 Mapping suitable habitats
80
54 Discussion and conclusions
85
55 Summary
86
Acknowledgements
87
Mapping Migratory Species Distribution Patterns
89
Remotesensing assessment of tropical habitat availability for a nearctic migrant The wood thrush
91
62 Study context
93
633 Ground truth of satellite data
94
64 Field survey results
95
643 Mistnet results
97
65 Modeling and analysis
99
66 Conservation applications
100
67 Conclusions
101
Acknowledgements
102
Using Maps for the Conservation of Large Mammals Around the Globe
105
Keeping elephants on the map Case studies of the application of GIS for conservation
107
711 The continental assessment
109
712 The acquisition storage manipulation and output of data
110
A GIS model for estimating elephant numbers in the forests of central Africa
112
722 Methodology
114
724 Conservation applications
116
832 Problems of habitat fragmentation
132
85 Redesign of the reserve system
133
86 Identification of critical habitat corridors
134
87 Management planning inside reserves
137
Acknowledgements
139
Appendix 82
140
References
141
Mapping the Global Distributions of Species
143
Mapping the distributions of restricted range birds to identify global conservation priorities
145
92 Context of this study
146
93 The methodology used to identify endemic bird areas
147
931 Database file structures
148
932 Future improvements to file structures
149
94 Project results
150
95 Conservation applications
151
96 An effective use for biodiversity data
152
97 Summary
153
Mapping and GIS analysis of the global distribution of coral reef fishes on an equalarea grid
155
1012 The information crisis
156
1013 The global perspective
157
1014 GIS tools and conservation
159
102 Methods
161
1022 Analysis
165
1032 Range sizes and taxonomic differences
168
1033 Centers of endemism and extinction
169
104 Conclusions
171
Acknowledgements
172
References
173
A Continental Conservation Monitoring Program
177
Linking plant species information to continental biodiversity inventory climate modeling and environmental monitoring
179
1112 Data considerations
180
1113 Systems infrastructure
181
1122 Data capture and standardization
182
1125 Endangered and vulnerable plants and animals
183
114 Multiple scale plant distribution patterns
184
1142 Using pointreferenced primary data
185
115 Data quality assurance
186
1152 Taxon validation
187
1153 Geographic validation
188
116 Development of a conservation strategy
189
117 Longterm environmental monitoring
192
118 Summary
193
Acknowledgements
194
Possibilities for the Future
197
Possibilities for the future
199
123 Future applications in ecology
200
124 Some promising future mapping approaches for conservation
201
1243 Grid mapping
202
126 Mapping and modeling at the global scale
203
References
204
Glossary
207
List of Acronyms
211
Index
213
Copyright

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Page 194 - JR (1986). A biogeoclimatic analysis of Nothofagus cunninghamii (Hook.) Oerst. in southeastern Australia. Australian Journal of Ecology, 11, 1-7.

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About the author (1994)

Ronald I. Miller was Senior Officer in the Species Mapping Section of the World Conservation Monitoring Centre, UK, and is now New England Gap Analysis Research Consultant, Amherst Massachusetts, having also worked for the World Bank and the Nature Conservancy.

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