London Magazine: Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer..., Volume 13

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C. Ackers, 1744 - English essays
 

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Page 631 - ... illustrious house. But, my Lords, the danger is common, and an invasion equally involves all our happiness, all our hopes, and all our fortunes. It cannot be thought consistent with the wisdom of your Lordships to be employed in determining private property, when so weighty an affair as the security of the whole kingdom demands your attention ; when it is not known but at this...
Page 416 - England, as the Lord High Admiral of Great Britain, or the Commiflioners for executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of Great Britain for the Time being, or any three or more of them, fhall, by any Letter or Order, in Writing under their Hands, directed to the Judge of the High Court of Admiralty in England for the Time being, appoint.
Page 315 - ... of a Being infinitely good. As to my body, my will is, that it be buried near the monument of my dear parents, at Twickenham, with the addition, after the words...
Page 417 - Finisterre, as shall by the lord high admiral, or commissioners for executing the office of lord high admiral of Great Britain for the time being...
Page 170 - Hostilities lately committed against Our Fleet in the Mediterranean; the Affront and Indignity offered to Us, by the Reception of the Son of the Pretender to Our Crown, in the French Dominions; the Embarkation actually made at Dunkirk, of a considerable Body of Troops, notoriously designed for an Invasion of this Kingdom, in Favour of the Pretender to Our Crown; and the...
Page 335 - If there be but two flag-officers, the chief shall have two third parts of the said one eighth part, and the other shall have the remaining third part ; but if the number of flag-officers be more than two, the chief shall have only one half, and the other half shall be equally divided amongst the other flag-officers.
Page 221 - Distils her dews, and from the silken gem Its lucid leaves unfolds : for him the hand Of autumn tinges every fertile branch With blooming gold and blushes like the morn.
Page 391 - I have examined and do find, Of all that favour me, There's none I grieve to leave behind, But only, only thee : To part with thee I needs must die, Could parting sep'rate thee and I.
Page 429 - England has no reafon to meddle with this quarrel, from any confideration of its commerce or otherwife. And that, altho...
Page 568 - Sword and Mace being carried before them and the City Officers attending, and from thence proceeded in the City Barge attended by the...

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