Abridgment of Murray's English Grammar: With an Appendix, Containing Exercises in Orthography, in Parsing, in Syntax, and in Punctuation. Designed for the Younger Classes of Learners. To which Questions are Added, Punctuation and the Notes Under Rules in Syntax ... Revised, Prepared, and Adapted to the Use of the "English Exercises."

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Lincoln & Edmands, 1830
 

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Page 116 - All Nature is but art, unknown to thee All chance, direction, which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good: And, spite of pride, in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear, Whatever is, is right.
Page 117 - The spacious firmament on high, With all the blue ethereal sky, And spangled heavens, a shining frame, Their great Original proclaim. The unwearied sun, from day to day, Does his Creator's power display, And publishes to every land The work of an Almighty hand.
Page 4 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 117 - What though, in solemn silence, all Move round the dark terrestrial ball ; What though no real voice nor sound Amid their radiant orbs be found ; In reason's ear they all rejoice, And utter forth a glorious voice, For ever singing as they shine, The hand that made us is divine.
Page 116 - Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife Their sober wishes never learn'd to stray; Along the cool sequester'd vale of life They kept the noiseless tenor of their way.
Page 115 - Who wickedly is wise, or madly brave, Is but the more a fool, the more a knave. Who noble ends by noble means obtains, Or failing, smiles in exile or in chains, Like good Aurelius let him reign, or bleed Like Socrates, that man is great indeed. What's fame? a fancied life in others' breath, A thing beyond us, ev'n before our death.
Page 116 - What nothing earthly gives, or can destroy, The soul's calm sunshine, and the heart-felt joy, Is virtue's prize: A better would you fix?
Page 20 - The Positive State expresses the quality of an object, without any increase or diminution : as, good, wise, great. The Comparative Degree increases or lessens the positive in signification: as, wiser, greater, less wise. The Superlative Degree increases or lessens the positive to the highest or lowest degree: as, wisest, greatest, least wise.
Page 114 - ORDER is Heaven's first law ; and this confest, Some are, and must be, greater than the rest, More rich, more wise; but who infers from hence That such are happier, shocks all common sense.
Page 9 - ENGLISH GRAMMAR. ENGLISH GRAMMAR is the art of speaking and writing the English language with propriety.

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