Return to the River: Restoring Salmon Back to the Columbia River

Front Cover
Richard N. Williams
Elsevier, Nov 21, 2005 - Science - 720 pages

Return to the River will describe a new ecosystem-based approach to the restoration of salmon and steelhead populations in the Columbia River, once one of the most productive river basins for anadromous salmonids on the west coast of North America. The approach of this work has broad applicability to all recovery efforts throughout the northern hemisphere and general applicability to fisheries and aquatic restoration efforts throughout the world.

The Pacific Northwest is now embroiled in a major public policy debate over the management and restoration of Pacific salmon. The outcome of the debate has the potential to affect major segments of the region's economy - river transportation, hydroelectric production, irrigated agriculture, urban growth, commercial and sport fisheries, etc. This debate, centered as it is on the salmon in all the rivers, has created a huge demand for information. The book will be a powerful addition to that debate.

  • A 15 year collaboration by a diverse group of scientists working on the management and recovery of salmon, steelhead trout, and wildlife populations in the Pacific Northwest
  • Includes over 200 figures, with four-color throughout the book
  • Discusses complex issues such as habitat degradation, juvenile survival through the hydrosystem, the role of artificial production, and harvest reform
 

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Contents

body
1
PART II THE SALMON ECOSYSTEM AND ITS MANAGEMENT
99
PART III A NEW VISION FOR RESTORATION
571

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Popular passages

Page 18 - Act are to provide a means whereby the ecosystems upon which endangered species and threatened species depend may be conserved, to provide a program for the conservation of such endangered species and threatened species...
Page 29 - It is a far, far better thing to have a firm anchor in nonsense than to put out on the troubled seas of thought.
Page 28 - JM 1973. Factors affecting the abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River.

About the author (2005)

Richard N. Williams is founding Director of the Wheatley Institution. From 2001 through 2008, he served as an Associate Academic Vice President for Faculty and Professor in the department of Psychology at Brigham Young University. His specialty areas include the philosophical, theoretical and historical foundations of psychology, with concentration on issues related to human agency, as well the science of psychology and research methods and statistics. Williams has authored, co-authored, or edited numerous journal, articles, and books. He has been a visiting faculty member at Duquesne University and at Georgetown University. He holds an M.S. and Ph.D. from Purdue University in Psychological Science and is a summa cum laude graduate of Brigham Young University. Williams and his wife Camille have 5 children and 18 grandchildren. Click here to see a full professional curriculum vitae.

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