Notes abroad and rhapsodies at home. By a veteran traveller [W.R. Wilson].

Front Cover
1837
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 29 - I thought so ; but know that speaking well of all mankind is the worst kind of detraction ; for it takes away the reputation of the few good men in the world by making all alike.
Page vi - A mind well skilled to find or forge a fault, A turn for punning, call it Attic salt ; To JEFFREY go, be silent and discreet, His pay is just ten sterling pounds per sheet : Fear not to lie...
Page 15 - As shallow streams run dimpling all the way. Whether in florid impotence he speaks, And as the prompter breathes, the puppet squeaks; Or at the ear of Eve, familiar toad, Half froth, half venom, spits himself abroad, In puns, or politics, or tales, or lies, Or spite, or smut, or rhymes, or blasphemies...
Page 258 - Doubtless the pleasure is as great In being cheated, as to cheat. As lookers-on find most delight, Who least perceive the juggler's sleight ; And still the less they understand, The more admire the sleight of hand.
Page 18 - Bertram, et id omne genus, viz., that of ministering to the depraved appetite for excitement, and, though in a far less degree, creating sympathy for the vicious and infamous, solely because the fiend is daring. Not twenty lines of Scott's poetry will ever reach posterity ; it has relation to nothing.
Page 309 - ... greater taste for the books of the ancients than for our own, on the simple ground that, being the first, the ancients are nearer to Nature, and have more native genius. Whatever La Motte and the Abbe Terrasson may say to the contrary, there is no real progress in reason in the human race, because what is gained on the one hand is lost on the other ; for as all minds always start from the same point, and as the time spent in learning what others have thought is lost for teaching one's self how...
Page 217 - ... no one who has not seen it can form any conception ; but when the dancers are females, it is not the best means which could be employed to inspire notions of delicacy in the minds of those ladies who are among the spectators. How they can, not only witness it without a blush mantling their cheeks, but talk of :it in terms of unqualified admiration to their acquaintances of the other sex, must appear passing strange to those who have not mixed in the society of the metropolis. In the provincial...
Page 225 - Sopra gli altari e su le chiese, a gara Le giuste fiamme lor tutte saettano. O pittori, o pittori, il ciel prepara Forse al vostro fallir le pene ultrici, E la tardanza ad aggravarle impara. Da voi di zelo e di pietÓ mendici, Ne' dý festivi a lavorar s'indugia, E si lascian le messe ei sagri offici.
Page 214 - I marked her increased agitation : I saw her cheeks flush, her eyes glisten, her bosom flutter, as if with sighs, I could not overhear, till at length, overpowered with emotion, she turned away her head, and covered her eyes with her hand.
Page 21 - Unsheaths his wings, and through the woods and glades Scatters a marvellous splendour. On he wheels, Blazing by fits as from excess of joy, Each gush of light a gush of ecstasy ; Nor unaccompanied; thousands that fling A radiance all their own, not of the day, Thousands as bright as he, from dusk till dawn...

Bibliographic information