The life of Samuel Johnson ... including A journal of his tour to the Hebrides. To which are added, Anecdotes by Hawkins, Piozzi, &c. and notes by various hands, Volume 1

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Page 226 - Where then shall hope and fear their objects find ? Must dull suspense corrupt the stagnant mind ? Must helpless man, in ignorance sedate, Roll darkling down the torrent of his fate...
Page 260 - In verbis etiam tenuis cautusque serendis, Dixeris egregie notum si callida verbum Reddiderit junctura novum. Si forte necesse est Indiciis monstrare recentibus abdita rerum, Fingere cinctutis non exaudita Cethegis Continget, dabiturque licentia sumpta pudenter ; Et nova fictaque nuper habebunt verba fidem si Graeco fonte cadant, parce detorta.
Page 105 - ... and I have ever thought that those who devote themselves to this employment, and do their duty with diligence and success, are entitled to very high respect from the community, as Johnson himself often maintained.
Page 235 - Somebody talked of happy moments for composition, and how a man can write at one time and not at another. "Nay," said Dr Johnson, "a man may write at any time if he will set himself doggedly to it.
Page 146 - Arts in their University. They highly extol the man's learning and probity ; and will not be persuaded, that the University will make any difficulty of conferring such a favour upon a stranger, if he is recommended by the Dean. They say, he is not afraid of the strictest examination, though he is of so long a journey ; and will venture it, if the Dean thinks it necessary : choosing rather to die upon the road, than be starved to death in translating for booksellers ; which has been his only subsistence...
Page 176 - It has been confidently related, with many embellishments, that Johnson one day knocked Osborne down in his shop, with a folio, and put his foot upon his neck. The simple truth I had from Johnson himself. " Sir, he was impertinent to me, and I beat him. But it was not in his shop: it was in my own chamber.
Page 69 - Law's Serious Call to a Holy Life,' expecting to find it a dull book (as such books generally are), and perhaps to laugh at it. But I found Law quite an overmatch for me ; and this was the first occasion of my thinking in earnest of religion, after I became capable of rational inquiry'.
Page 22 - I cannot conceive a more perfect mode of writing any man's life, than not only relating all the most important events of it in their order, but interweaving what he privately wrote, and said, and thought ; by which mankind are enabled, as it were, to see him live, and to ' live o'er each scene' * with him, as he actually advanced through the several stages of his life.
Page 142 - Has heaven reserved, in pity to the poor, No pathless waste, or undiscover'd shore ? No secret island in the boundless main ? No peaceful desert yet unclaim'd by Spain ? Quick let us rise, the happy seats explore, And bear Oppression's insolence no more.
Page 45 - ... when a boy he was immoderately fond of reading romances of chivalry, and he retained his fondness for them through life; so that [adds his Lordship] spending part of a summer at my parsonage-house in the country, he chose for his regular reading the old Spanish romance of Felixmarte of Hircania, in folio, which he read quite through. Yet I have heard him attribute to these extravagant fictions that unsettled turn of mind which prevented his ever fixing in any profession.

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