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and at the close of his reply seems greatly dejected.

Mrs. N.—Though Harriot could not name the scene, will you permit her, Sir, to try if she can recollect the history?

Ex.-That, Madam, will afford me pleasure.

Mrs. N.-Harriot, as your sister has opened the prison, can you inform me what followed Joseph's prediction ?

Harriot.-I am sorry, Mamma, that I was so much at a loss, I hope you are not displeased with me, you know I have never been within side a prison.: I will proceed with the history immediately. The events agreed with Joseph's interpretation of the dreams,

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for on the third day afterwards when Pharaoh made a feast to all his servants, on account of his birth-day, he restored the chief butler to his butlership again; but he hanged the chief baker, as Joseph had predicted.

Mrs. N.–Very well, my dear, I am not displeased with you; could you inform me, Sir, why Joseph used the same expression to foretel events so very dissimilar ?

" Within three days shall Pharaoh lift up thine head.”

Ex.-Pardon me, Madam, but if you apply that sentence to both the butler and the baker, your quotation will not be perfectly correct; for to the interpretation of the baker's dream, a few words are added, which fully designate the catastrophe which followed.

“ The ancients in keeping their reckonings, or accounts of time, or their list of domestic officers or servants, made use of tables with holes bored in them, in which they put a sort of pegs, or nails with broad heads, exhibiting the particulars, either number or name, or whatever it was. Those nails or pegs, the Jews call heads, and the sockets of the heads they call bases. The meaning, therefore, of Pharaoh's lifting up his head is, that Pharaoh would take out the peg, which had the cup-bearer's name on the top of it, to read it; i. e. would sit in judgment, and make examination

into his accounts; for it seems very probable, that both he and the baker had been either suspected or accused of having cheated the King, and that, when their accounts were examined and cast up, the one was acquitted, while the other was found guilty. And, though Joseph uses the same expression in both cases, yet we may observe that, speaking to the baker, he adds, that Pharaoh shall lift up thine head from off thee; i. e. shall order thy name to be struck out of the list of his servants, by taking thy peg out of the socket.”

Mrs. N.-Accept my thanks, Sir, you not only instruct my daughters, by your scenery, but their Mamma,

by your observations; this subject, it is true, never caused her much uneasiness, but she readily acknowledges she did not previously so fully understand it.

Ex.-Your approval, Madam, of my feeble remarks, is highly gratifying, for it was my design in constructing the camera, to impart any little information of which I may be possessed, to any who honour me with their attendance on my exhibition.

Young ladies, will you now favour me with

your

observations ? Harriot, as she eagerly sprang to the Camera, said, Well, although I could not discover the prison scene, I think I can name this without any difficulty. If I am not mistaken, Ja

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