Page images
PDF
EPUB
[graphic][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

ORVILLE HARROLD, THE PREMIER OF AMERICAN TENORS

Photographs copyrighted by H. Mishkin, N. Y.

conversation ended in Mrs. Boyd's offer to give wrote him, after his brilliant début at the Metrohim free vocal lessons.

politan, saying: "I always expected it." His removal to Indiana ended the lessons after Alexander Ernestinoff, a Russian conductor, a few months. But Mrs. Gaston Boyd still lives gave concerts in Muncie. The young tenor was and rejoices in the fortunes of her pupil. She one of an ensemble of local singers whom he

1

hurriedly collected. He detected the voice that signed a contract with me at sixty dollars a week was so much higher and sweeter and richer than and arranged to send me to Oscar Saenger, the the others: “You must have lessons, my boy,” vocal teacher. Mr. Hammerstein paid for my he said and he gave them, as Mrs. Gaston Boyd lessons. When his season opened at the London had given them, without recompense, save that Opera House, I was one of his singers. He sent joy which pervades the heart of a true musician me to Paris to take vocal lessons. My star was at the discovery of an exceptional gift.

in the ascendant. Madame Schumann-Heink, while giving a con- “But Mr. Hammerstein's failure in London cert at Muncie, heard the same voice clear, nearly killed me. I had to go back to vaudeville high, fresh as the dew on a June rose. “Whose and comic opera. I reorganized the quartette. voice is that different one?” asked the visiting I sang for awhile with ‘Naughty Marietta.' star. “The high one? That belongs to Orville Those quartette days in vaudeville were not Harrold,” answered the local director. “Bring simply lean. They were bony. I was up against him to me,” she commanded.

it. We took a room on Thirty-eighth Street, The young man was brought in and bashfully between Seventh and Eighth Avenues. All of us and awkwardly acknowledged the presentation slept in that room." to the great singer honored on two continents. "You have a voice that will make you a great

A Modest American singer. You should go into grand opera. You NY park-bench nights?" I queried. have the voice for it,” she said. That was all,

“No. I always managed to sleep under but it implanted definite ambition in the country cover. But I have split a ten-cent beef stew." boy's heart. It set, a star high in the heaven of “Which means?" his hope. He resolved to go to New York. He “That we would go into a cheap restaurant arrived with a letter to a manager of one of the together and order a plate of beef stew and two Shubert companies in one pocket and two and a spoons. We ate together until the plate was half dollars in the other.

emptied, a time that came too soon." “I stopped at the Grand Union Hotel, across “And now, you are the American Caruso with the street from the Grand Central Station.” So an extended repertoire." the tenor told me the tale of his entrance into “I know twenty-five rôles.” Does any unNew York. “I got a room for'a dollar and a musical person among my readers know what quarter. The next day, I called on Claxton toil and study this represents? Most opera Wilstach and presented my letter of introduction. singers are identified with three or four rôles. It was from relatives of his at Muncie. He “But I am not a Caruso,” says Orville Harrold, invited me to go up to his apartment for dinner "and never will be. Caruso's voice is the voice that evening, an invitation which I accepted with of the ages. It has a quality unlike any other. It greater pleasure than he knew. We talked about will never be repeated. I won because I thought my experience. I sang for him. He told me to I could win.” be at the office next morning and he would have Mr. Harrold's peregrinations led him to me sing for Lee Shubert. I wasn't late at that Chicago. He sang at Ravenna. There, members appointment. Mr. Shubert said, after hearing of the Metropolitan Opera House organization me, “I'll give him a job right away.' He put heard him and reported his quality to their chief, me into 'The Social Whirl,' at the Casino. I Signor Gatti Cazazza. earned fifty dollars a week, more money than I Riccardo Martin was singing with that cohad ever dreamed of getting. I remained with the operative band of artists, The American Singers show until it went to Philadelphia. I didn't want Society, at the Park Theater, New York. Mr. to leave New York, so I remained here and tried Martin was indisposed and Mr. Harrold was to get other work. joined three other fellows in asked to sing his rôle. Again, representatives of a quartette. We went on the vaudeville circuit. the Metropolitan Opera House force were presI had to leave town after all. Our bookings ent. Again a report reached Gatti Cazazza of a brought us back to the Victoria Theater. Oscar tenor that surpassed at least all native products. Hammerstein heard me sing. He asked me to go Mr. Harrold was invited to an audition.

He down to the Manhattan Opera House the next joined the Metropolitan Opera Singers. day. After the audition he came close to me and Farther heights? He says not. He thinks touched my throat. He said: 'My boy, you've that “a man who, at forty-three, has brought up got it here but,' his finger shifted to my forehead. his three children well, and has a farm in Con'What have you got there? I answered: 'I necticut to which he can bring his father and don't know what I've got there, Mr. Hammer- mother, hasn't done badly.” He wants to live on stein, I haven't had a chance to test it.' He that farm and “be a free man.”

No One Can Scrutinize the Evidence for Premonitions Assembled Since The Society for Psychical Research Was Founded, without Admitting that it Raises Problems to be Solved

By H. ADDINGTON BRUCE
Author of "Sleep and Sleeplessness," "Nerve Control and How to Gain It," etc.

PART II

-EDITORS' NOTE

in We hold no brief in the matter. But we would Mr. H. Addington Bruce's entertaining treat- like to hear from our readers regarding the subment of a very interesting subject. He gives ject. Perhaps you will be glad to tell us of any here nine different unquestionable records of premonitions you have had, or any previous warnhappenings that actually followed distinct warn- ings of evil or danger or anything else that came ings. These, (added to the true stories in Mr. to pass. We will be glad to consider your manuBruce's previous instalment, in our February scripts for publication, and to pay promptly for issue, provide rather startling evidence that there any that may prove acceptable. All manuscripts may be some basis for a belief in premonitions. should be in this office not later than April 1.

N

Historic Dream of John Williams the place where the ball had struck him, his O less extraordinary is the historic dream countenance instantly altered, and he fell to

of John Williams, mirroring the murder the ground. Upon inquiry who the sufferer

of Mr. Perceval, in the House of Com- might be, I was informed that he was the chanmons, eight days before its occurrence. The cellor. I understood him to be Mr. Perceval, Society for Psychical Research has an account of chancellor of the exchequer. I further saw the this, purporting to be in Mr. Williams's own murderer laid hold of by several of the gentlewords, and signed by him. He was living, at

men in the room. the time of the dream, in Cornwall, busy with "Upon waking, I told the particulars to my the management of some large mines, and giving wife; she treated the matter lightly, and desired no thought to political affairs.

me to go to sleep, saying it was only a dream. “About the second or third day of May, 1812,” I soon fell asleep again, and again the dream his narrative runs, “I dreamed that I was in the presented itself with precisely the same circumlobby of the House of Commons-a place well stances. After waking the second time, and known to me. A small man, dressed in a blue stating the matter again to my wife, she only coat and white waistcoat entered, and imme- repeated her request that I would compose mydiately I saw a person

self, and dismiss the whom I had observed

subject from my mind. on my first entrance

On my falling asleep dressed in a snuff-col

The Real Man

the third time, the ored coat with metal

same dream, without buttons, take a pistol TAKE no thought of my neigh

any alteration, was refrom under his coat, bor's birth, or the way he makes

peated, and I awoke as his prayer; and present it at the

on the former occalittle man above menI grant him a White Man's place on

sions in great agitation. tioned. earth, if his game is on the square.

“So much alarmed “The pistol was If he plays straight, I'll call him mate;

and impressed was I discharged, and the if he cheats, I'll drop him flat.

that I felt much doubt ball entered under the All rank but this is a worn-out lie, for

whether it was not my left breast of the pereach CLEAN man is as good as I,

duty to take a journey And a KING is no more than that. son against whom it

to London, and comwas directed. I saw

-The Rotarian

municate upon the subthe blood issue from

ject with the party

I

AGAI

а

principally concerned. Upon this point I con- that might be cited. Mrs. A. W. Verrall, a sulted with some friends whom I met on busi- prominent member of the Society for Psychical ness the following day. They dissuaded me from Research, who has cultivated the faculty of my purpose, saying I might expose myself to automatic writing, on December 11, 1901, found contempt and vexation, or be taken up as a in her automatic script these puzzling sentences: fanatic. Upon this, I said no more but anx- "Nothing too mean—the trivial helps-gives iously watched the newspapers.

confidence. Hence this: Frost and a candle in “On the evening of May 13, my second son, the dim light. Marmontel, he was reading on returning from Truro, came in a hurried manner a sofa, or in bed—there was only a candle's into the room where I was sitting, and exclaimed, light. She will surely remember this. The ‘Oh, father, your dream has come true! Mr. book was lent, not his own-he talked about it.” Perceval has been shot in the lobby of the A week later there was evidently a recurrence House of Commons; there is an account come in the script to the same topic, for Mrs. Verrall to Truro from London. The fact was,

Mr. discovered that she had then automatically Perceval was assassinated on the evening of the written: eleventh.”

“Marmontel is right. It was a French book,

a memoir, I think. Passy may help, Souvenirs Named His Pallbearers

de Passy, or Fleury. Marmontel was not on the GAIN, chance may account for some, but cover—the book was bound and was lent-two

it cannot be made to account for all of volumes in old-fashioned binding and print." the numerous instances in which the warning of She had no idea what all this meant. But death comes in a dream, not to a second party three months afterwards the mystery was but to the person who is to die. One of the solved-or, perhaps, I should say, was made best authenticated cases of the kind occurred more mysterious—with the arrival of a friend, some years ago at Valparaiso, Indiana, in con- Mr. Marsh, for a week-end visit. The evening nection with the death of Thomas Pratt, a well- of his arrival he chanced to mention that, known merchant of that city. Mr. Pratt was shortly before, he had been reading a volume of a veteran of the Civil War, and many of his the “Memoirs" of Marmontel, a French author. friends and former comrades were in the habit At once, remembering the references in the of dropping into his store two or three times a automatic script, Mrs. Verrall asked for parweek, to exchange reminiscences. One evening, ticulars, and learned that he had been reading when half a dozen were present, he told them of this book on two nights, February 20 and 21; a peculiar dream he had had the previous night. that on both occasions he had read it by candle

He had dreamed, he said, that he was dead, light, once while in bed and the other time yet possessed the strange power of one in a while lying on two chairs; that the volume trance to see all that went on about him. In contained allusions to both Fleury and Passy, the dream he watched with interest the prepara- and that it was not a book of his own but one he tions for his burial, and even noted the names of had borrowed from a public library. those selected to serve as pallbearers. He saw There were certain minor discrepancies behimself borne to Memorial Hall for the funeral tween his account and the statements in the services, and afterwards taken to the cemetery, script, but the general coincidence was so close where his coffin was lowered into the grave. as to convince Mrs. Verrall that her automatic With the throwing of the first spadeful of earth, writing of December, 1901, had accurately prehe awoke.

dicted her friend's action on two nights in His friends joked with him about the dream, February, 1902. and, in a few minutes, departed, leaving him to all appearance in the best of health. But the

The Ruined Carpet next morning he was found dead in bed, and the GAIN, Mrs. J. W. Mackenzie, of Rossmen whom he had named in his dream were the pallbearers at his funeral.

morning, detailed an odd little dream she had

had the previous night. The Coincidence of a Book

"I thought,” she said, “that there were a ND, as was said, there may also be pre- number of people in our drawing room, among

monitions of a most vivid, explicit others Mr. Jones, and that I left the room for a character relating to events that have no sinister few minutes to see if supper was ready. When significance, but on the contrary are common- I came back I found the carpet, which was a place, everyday occurrences. I have space for new one, all covered with black spots. I was but two illustrative instances out of the many very angry, and when Mr. Jones said it was ink,

Ashire

, Scotland, at breakfast one Sunday

[ocr errors]

D

I retorted, 'Don't say that. I know it has been of perception and memory. It has been proved burned,' and I counted five patches. With by repeated experiments that all of us perceive that my dream ended.”

much more than we are aware of. We see Some jesting remarks were made, and, in a things, literally, “out of the corner of our eye,” few minutes, the family started for church. and sensations of all kinds which fail to make a There they met the Mr. Jones of her dream, and conscious impression on us are subconsciously invited him, with some other friends, to take perceived and registered on the cells of our luncheon with them. Almost immediately upon brain, whence they may be afterwards recalled returning to the house, Mrs. Mackenzie noticed either spontaneously or experimentally. Thus a spot on the drawing-room carpet. Wonderingly it is that a hypnotized person is able to remember she asked what could have caused it, and when many facts in his past life of which he has no Mr. Jones suggested, “It looks like ink,” recollection in the normal waking state, and of exclaimed:

which he may never consciously have been “Oh, my dream! My new carpet! Ruined!" aware. The same emergence of subconscious It was then found that a careless housemaid perceptions and memories has been observed in had allowed some live coals to fall on the carpet dreams, in crystal visions, in automatic writing. from a shovel, burning five small holes.

This was amusingly demonstrated, some time In a case like this it is obviously absurd to ago, by Dr. Morton Prince, a well-known raise the cry of "spirits" in seeking an explana- psychologist. tion. “Spirits" surely have something better to

Even to His Teeth do than to go about announcing to anxious housewives the future occurrence of trifling OCTOR PRINCE introduced a friend of domestic mishaps. And there are so many

his, a Massachusetts judge, to a lady in cases on the same order that even those spiritis- whom, like Mrs. Verrall, the faculty of autotically inclined, when they really give thought matic writing was well developed. They chatted to the subject have been forced to some other together a few minutes, then Dr. Prince sudhypothesis.

denly interposed a screen between the lady and

his friend, and asked her to describe the latter's We Perceive More Than We Are

clothing. She replied that she had not noticed Aware of

what he was wearing, beyond the fact that he ERHAPS that most in favor just now, had on a dark-colored suit. Thereupon, Dr.

among believers in the occult, is one sug- Prince placed a pencil in her hand, put paper gested by the late Frederic Myers, to the effect before her, and, still keeping the judge conthat possibly a cosmic picture-gallery, so to cealed by the screen, requested her to try again. speak, or photographic or phonographic record In a few moments her hand began to write, of all that has occurred, or will occur, in the describing with the utmost accuracy every universe, may in some sense exist, and may at detail in the judge's dress, even to the pattern of times be partly open and dimly decipherable. his necktie and the number of buttons on his But such a hypothesis inevitably involves an coat. Finally, to Dr. Prince's horror, the autoappallingly fatalistic view of the order of the matic script completed the enumeration with the world; and, in truth, is nullified by the fact that, embarrassing item-“False teeth.” as we have seen, many premonitions indicate a It seemingly makes no difference how long a course of action which, if followed, will avert time has elapsed since the original sensations their fulfilment.

were consciously or subconsciously perceived. In point of fact, I do not believe it is necessary, Under appropriate conditions they may be in order to explain any premonition of attested recalled, and, what is most significant, it has record, to go beyond the known, natural laws of been discovered that they often are recalled in mental action. Not so long ago, this could not the form of auditory or visual hallucinations-have been affirmed with any degree of con- as when a crystal gazer sees in the polished fidence; but the science of psychology has been surface of her crystal a hallucinatory picture making marvelous strides of late, and has im- representing some scene, it may be of her earliest measurably enlarged our knowledge of the childhood. Or, as in the following instance: powers and activities of the human mind, by

Subconscious Perceptions discoveries many of which have a direct bearing on alleged supernormal phenomena like those I WOMAN in Brooklyn, while apparently have described.

in full possession of her faculties, had a Of greatest importance in this connection is hallucinatory vision of a garden back of a the light that has been thrown on the processes house, surrounded by a high fence, and con

Pamor

A '

« PreviousContinue »