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have and for this reason and behind the screen of anonymit; ve written the foregoing. I am willing to leave “moralizing” about my case to others. For myself an simply say that a bit of homely philosophy has dont more than anything else to keep me “in the game." It is this: complaining would do no good, but

rather would make things harder, both for me and for those of my family who have so faithfully cared for me. By maintaining my interest in my profession and in world events my mind is kept busy and there is no time for introspective thoughts, which cause havoc with the dispositions of many invalids.

T

SECOND-PRIZE ARTICLE

By JULIA GWIN, Atlanta, Ga. \HE greatest handicap that has ever confronted est handicap. If you are one of those who have enme, and I believe this is true of most of us if we dured this curse of temperament and wanderlust let

would admit it, was my restless, dissatisfied, dis- me tell you how to free yourself. contented spirit abetted by an ungovernable temper. If you really want contentment and peace of mind, My parents tell me that, as a toddling infant, I would if you really desire the beautiful, unruffled calm of a stamp my baby foot in rage when opposed in the slight- tranquil spirit, bring all your will-power to the fore and est whim. As I grew into young ladyhood this temper conquer yourself. Make your moods subservient to had not mellowed a whit. It took so little to throw your mind and strengthen that mind that the petty, me into a fit of anger or prolonged attacks of moodi- every day worries may not upset the smoothly moving ness. Nothing seemed to suit me. I was eternally current of your life. reaching for the things I did not have, simply When wild thoughts enter my mind or a longing for because they were unattainable. No one place things beyond my grasp I close my eyes tightly, for held any great charm for me except that place somehow that seems to help, and say over and over: where I was not.

“No,*I don't want to do that. I am perfectly satisI am the granddaughter of a man whose whole life fied,” until a deep peace envelops me. was spent in the ministry of love, in the service of God, a man whose life stands out snow white in comparison OVER the portals of the oracle at Delphi is inwith my stormy, tempestuous life. Strange that his scribed these words: “KNOW THYSELF!" teachings should have failed to reach their mark with When we have acquired this inner knowledge, this me! I must have been born with the soul of a gypsy, understanding human power, the rest is easy. Confor unrest was assuredly, a part of my make-up.

quering myself has been a slow process but one well I am now twenty-one years old-young as the world worth the mental effort expended, for it has brought reckons age-and have almost overcome my great- me a joy of living I have never known before.

W

THIRD-PRIZE ARTICLE

By ELMA E. SEILER, Kansas E all have our follies and faults, always have WHAT would become of the world; or, rather, I had and always will have. Thus we must be should say, what would have become of the

constantly on the guard and lookout lest they world, had it not been for personal pride and self-rebecome the victors, and we the victims of defeat. spect? The iron rule and fear of results may prompt

Every one has his own battles to fight, his own handi- some people from doing evil, but those people are but caps to overcome. And as we overthrow and conquer few in comparison with those prompted by personal them, one by one, we become stronger and better men pride and self-respect. and women.

I took advantage of this truth as a means of overMy greatest handicap, and I feel confident that I coming my handicap. I set my standard above all was not its only possessor, was indulging in petty such petty folly and gossip. After accomplishing this, gossip in various lighter forms, and also finding fault I no longer vowed in vain never again to indulge in with my friends' companions and my fellowmen. It gossip and faultfinding, but kept myself forever conis an easy matter to pick out your faults, and still scious of the fact that I was above all such faults. I easier matter to pick out your neighbor's faults. But have found but little, if any, trouble to refrain from all it is an altogether different proposition to conquer those talk that is in any way detrimental to any one's good faults. I do not know and would not attempt to declare how often I vowed never again to say, or repeat Most criminals have some personal pride, self-reanything evil about my friends and fellowmen. But spect and honor, and below this level they will not fall, human nature is so weak in this respect, and over and It is when one loses all such pride and respect, it is then over again esp ally when in a crowd, I found myself and not before that all hope for his or her recovery is guilty of the offense. It was then that I realized that lost. "Set your standards sky high." I must find some other means of overcoming this handi- To those who do not believe they can rise above their cap, for handicap it is.

big as well as little handicaps, I say, “Try and see.”

name.

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BE POPULAR!

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THY envy your friends their knowledge of how to play instrument? Be talented yourself. Make friends. Make

FREE LESSONS IN money. Teach your children. You yourself can master any

Piano Piccolo musical art right in your own home with the greatest ease. Organ Ukelele

We have taught thousands how to play their favorite Violin Sight musical instruments easily, quickly and thoroughly without Cornet Singing a teacher just by following our New Improved Home Study

Guitar Saxophone Method.

Banjo Viola We do away with the private teacher. We banish dry,

Harp Tenor Banjo

Mandolin Hawaiian tiresome exercises. We teach you by note. No numbers;

'Cello Steel Guitar no tricks, a sound musical education. We make it as fas

Trombone Harmony cinating for you to learn as it will be fascinating for you to Clarinet and show your friends what a good musician you are. Our pu- Flute Composition pils are in demand as entertainers, and some of them have Drums and Traps written to us that they are making money through the musical talents they developed by our Home Training Method.

Our free book tells you all about it. Read the letters in it and you will see that what others have done easily, you can also do easily. More than 250,000 men, women and children have learned by our system. Best of all-We give you all lessons free. Write at once for particulars. MUSIC LESSONS FREE-ACT NOW!

i U.S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC Just mail the coupon. Because we need one pupil in each locality at once to help us advertise our marvelously easy 1 1431 Brunswick Bldg., New York system of teaching music, we offer for a limited time our lessons without cost, and charge you only for postage and 1

Gentlemen: Please send me your free sheet music, the total cost of which averages only a few cents book. "Music Lessons in

Own a lesson. A musical education in any instrument for the price Home," and particulars of your special of a movie ticket each week. Beginners or advanced pupils.

offer. This offer is too important to hesitate over. Get the proofs, facts, letters from our pupils. Get our fascinating

Name. new book just issued, together with our astounding offer. All of these come to you FREE. Just drop us a postal or

(Please Print Name) mail the coupon today. Instruments supplied when needed, cash or credit.

Address. U. S. SCHOOL OF

City. 1431 Brunswick Building

New York

MUSIC

State.

have and for this reason and behind the screen of anonymit; ve written the foregoing. I am willing to leave "moralizing" about my case to others. For myself an simply say that a bit of homely philosophy has dont more than anything else to keep me "in the game." It is this: complaining would do no good, but

rather would make things harder, both for me and for those of my family who have so faithfully cared for me. By maintaining my interest in my profession and in world events my mind is kept busy and there is no time for introspective thoughts, which cause havoc with the dispositions of many invalids.

T

SECOND-PRIZE ARTICLE

By JULIA GWIN, Atlanta, Ga. \HE greatest handicap that has ever confronted est handicap. If you are one of those who have enme, and I believe this is true of most of us if we dured this curse of temperament and wanderlust let

would admit it, was my restless, dissatisfied, dis- me tell you how to free yourself. contented spirit abetted by an ungovernable temper. If you really want contentment and peace of mind, My parents tell me that, as a toddling infant, I would if you really desire the beautiful, unruffled calm of a stamp my baby foot in rage when opposed in the slight- tranquil spirit, bring all your will-power to the fore and est whim. As I grew into young ladyhood this temper conquer yourself. Make your moods subservient to had not mellowed a whit. It took so little to throw your mind and strengthen that mind that the petty, me into a fit of anger or prolonged attacks of moodi- every day worries may not upset the smoothly moving ness. Nothing seemed to suit me. I was eternally current of your life. reaching for the things I did not have, simply When wild thoughts enter my mind or a longing for because they were unattainable. No one place things beyond my grasp I close my eyes tightly, for held any great charm for me except that place somehow that seems to help, and say over and over: where I was not.

"No,*I don't want to do that. I am perfectly satis: I am the granddaughter of a man whose whole life fied,” until a deep peace envelops me. was spent in the ministry of love, in the service of God, a man whose life stands out snow white in comparison OVER the portals of the oracle at Delphinis inwith my stormy, tempestuous life. Strange that his scribed these words: “KNOW THYSELF!" teachings should have failed to reach their mark with When we have acquired this inner knowledge, this me! I must have been born with the soul of a gypsy, understanding human power, the rest is easy. Confor unrest was assuredly, a part of my make-up. quering myself has been a slow process but one well

I am now twenty-one years old-young as the world worth the mental effort expended, for it has brought reckons age-and have almost overcome my great- me a joy of living I have never known before,

W

THIRD-PRIZE ARTICLE

By ELMA E. SEILER, Kansas En all have our follies and faults, always have WHAT, would become of the world; cor, rather, I had and . be

constantly on the guard and lookout lest they world, had it not been for personal pride and self-rebecome the victors, and we the victims of defeat. spect? The iron rule and fear of results may prompt

Every one has his own battles to fight, his own handi- some people from doing evil, but those people are but caps to overcome. And as we overthrow and conquer few in comparison with those prompted by personal them, one by one, we become stronger and better men pride and self-respect. and women.

I took advantage of this truth as a means of overMy greatest handicap, and I feel confident that I coming my handicap. I set my standard above all was not its only possessor, was indulging in petty such petty folly and gossip. After accomplishing this, gossip in various lighter forms, and also finding fault I no longer vowed in vain never again to indulge in with my friends' companions and my fellowmen. It gossip and faultfinding, but kept myself forever conis an easy matter to pick out your faults, and still scious of the fact that I was above all such faults. I easier matter to pick out your neighbor's faults. But have found but little, if any, trouble to refrain from all it is an altogether different proposition to conquer those talk that is in any way detrimental to any one's good faults. I do not know and would not attempt to declare how often I vowed never again to say, or repeat Most criminals have some personal pride, self-reanything evil about my friends and fellowmen. But spect and honor, and below this level they will not fall, human nature is so weak in this respect, and over and It is when one loses all such pride and respect, it is then over again espally when in a crowd, I found myself and not before that all hope for his or her recovery is guilty of the offense. It was then that I realized that lost. "Set your standards sky high." I must find some other means of overcoming this bandi- To those who do not believe they can rise above their cap, for handicap it is.

big as well as little handicaps, I say, “Try and see."

name.

[graphic]

BE POPULAR! ! MAKE MONEY! LEARN MUSIC AT HOME

THY envy your friends their knowledge of how to play instrument? Be talented yourself. Make friends. Make

FREE LESSONS IN money. Teach your children. You yourself can master any

Piano Piccolo musical art right in your own home with the greatest ease.

Organ Ukelele We have taught thousands how to play their favorite Violin Sight musical instruments easily, quickly and thoroughly without Cornet Singing a teacher just by following our New Improved Home Study

Guitar Saxophone Method.

Banjo Viola We do away with the private teacher. We banish dry,

Harp Tenor Banjo

Mandolin Hawaiian tiresome exercises. We teach you by note. No numbers;

'Cello Steel Guitar no tricks, a sound musical education. We make it as fas- Trombone Harmony cinating for you to learn as it will be fascinating for you to Clarinet and show your friends what a good musician you are. Our pu- Flute Composition pils are in demand as entertainers, and some of them have Drums and Traps written to us that they are making money through the musical talents they developed by our Home Training Method.

Our free book tells you all about it. Read the letters in it and you will see that what others have done easily, you can also do easily. More than 250,000 men, women and children have learned by our system. Best of all-We give you all lessons free. Write at once for particulars. MUSIC LESSONS FREE-ACT NOW!

i U.S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC Just mail the coupon. Because we need one pupil in each locality at once to help us advertise our marvelously easy 1 1431 Brunswick Bldg., New York system of teaching music, we offer for a limited time our lessons without cost, and charge you only for postage and

Gentlemen: Please send me your free sheet music, the total cost of which averages only a few cents book. “Music Lessons in

Own a lesson. A musical education in any instrument for the price Home," and particulars of your special of a movie ticket each week. Beginners or advanced pupils. . offer.

This offer is too important to hesitate over. Get the proofs, facts, letters from our pupils. Get our fascinating new book just issued, together with our astounding offer. All of these come to you FREE. Just drop us a postal or

(Please Print Name) mail the coupon today.

Instruments supplied when needed, cash or credit. U. S. SCHOOL OF

City. 1431 Brunswick Building

New York 1

MUSIC

State.

Conversation as the Basis

of Oratory

By H. BURNHAM RIGBY

SECOND ARTICLE

W

HATEVER be a young man's ambition to which are clear, strong, and simple, and they express speak well in public, the one preparation which your meaning better than the fifty. This elimination

is easiest, nearest, the most natural and in all is the process of art. One with the “gift of gab" will ways the best is conversation, for there is no degree of read a half column narrative and repeat it to you in oratorical excellence which may not find in this its two columns. An artistic narrator may repeat it in appropriate discipline. It is governed by the same a paragraph. Rejection and selection must be a daily laws of art, and he who resolves to be a skilful public- study. To say no useless thing, to utter no word that speaker may thus begin his private training at once can be spared—this is the way of art which demands and continue it every day.

simplicity and brevity. First, if one wishes to do this, he must wipe out all profanities, deformities, and useless exclamations; all

Don't Be a Word Miser meaningless repetitions such as “Don't you know?” “Don't you see?” “Don't you understand?” “Don't

OF course we must guard against baldness. We you think so?”—also such drawlings as “Well--a--a do not like one who is grumpy and speaks in a--I'll tell you-a-a- It was this way-a-a-a- ejaculations and abbreviations, too lazy to open his

All such apologies for sluggish thought and deficiency mouth. A miser in words is offensive, like a miser of language must be eliminated. Make no sound but with money. A certain fulness of expression is wanted. words, and let these be clear, clean and concise. If and the ear must be satisfied. you cannot find the right word at once, then speak Shakespeare often uses a word which is not necesslowly; in any case, start rightly and on a basis of cor- sary to the meaning but quite necessary to the melody. rectness, and keep this up at every step until it becomes A word that is needed for melody cannot be spared. a confirmed and unconscious habit. Let no one hear This is also the politeness of language. We must not you talk slang because you cannot find better words.

be harsh and abrupt, since sound and meaning rightly If, on the other hand, you are already fluent, re- used are one. Many persons add charm to their conmember there must be no rhetorical bow wow, nor any versation by unconscious rhythm, which may or may attempt at a grand oratorical style, which is out of not have come from training. place in conversation. Whether you talk with one or To converse daily throughout the year gives us many with many, simplicity is the first thing to aim at and opportunities to try every experiment in the use of the last thing you will acquire.

words, and to select a word with rapidity and precision

is a great acquirement. . Some will say, “Never mind "Gift of Gab" Not Oratory

the words: attend to your thinking and words will take

care of themselves.” But if we are to think in words Do not confound gift of gab” with oratory or con- we must acquire the words first, and our problem is to

versation, for it has nothing to do with them. make the thinking words our speaking words, also, and The so-called “gift of gab” is not a gift at all, but an this can come only through discipline. affliction--a leakage of the brain. Words, words, words-when you expect a pint you get a gallon.

English Is What We Make It "Gift of gab” means confusion of ideas, rambling, irrelevance, no sense of proportion, no art, no sym- WE have the finest language in the world and the pathy. “Gift of gab” comes from mental poverty; best working vocabulary. On paper there are conversation, from mental wealth.

70,000 or 80,000 words, but many of these are words Good conversation begins in good thinking, and in reserve, to be used but seldom. Roughly speaking, seeks artistic expression. The secret of artistic ex- we have from 30,000 to 40,000 good workable words pression lies in pruning. Your impulse tempts you to choose from. Someone has taken pains to find out to use, let us say, fifty words in a statement. A mo- that of these Milton used, for himself, 8,000 words and ment's thought shows that twenty could be thrown Shakespeare 15,000—our language gives plenty of room aside. From the thirty remaining you select twenty for thought to revel in. Like the British people it is

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