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I to follow the bent of my humour I should cer

tainly assume the favour of an Incognito, parcequ'il y a quelque chose de joli d'être auteur sans y être

connu;"_but even this gratification, my love of candour at once repels, even though my risk in literary fame becomes “ doubly hazardous," when I reflect

that,

Quand on lit un ouvrage sans nom, on se

trouve suspendu entre la crainte de mépriser un auteur celébre, et celle d'admirer un Ecrivain mediocre;

on a recours a son pis aller, et ne pouvant pas juger

par prevention, on est forcé de decider par son gout,

et discernement." par

"*

When BURTON first published his celebrated “ Anatomy of Melancholy," under the signature of

Democritus Junior, he thus cautioned the more cu

rious part of his Readers. -"Seek not after that

Misanthrope.

which is hid—if the contents please thee, and be for

thy use, suppose the man in the moon, or whom thou

wilt, to be the author. I would not willingly be known. If I be pressed, I will as readily reply, as

that Egyptian in PLUTARCH, when a curious fellow

would needs know what he had in his basket. Quum

vides velatam, cur inquiris in rem absconditam ?”.

Far from adopting disguise or seeking concealment, 1 cordially invite my kind and indulgent readers, to assure themselves of my identity, by honoring me

with a visit at Sibyl Lodge; where they shall, at all

times, be most cordially received by

Their's and the Public's

Faithfully devoted

(Though not humble) Servant,

PETER QUINCE,

the Younger.

Sibyl Lodge, Cheltenham, June 4th, 1820.

N. B. It is necessary to premise, that I am by no

means responsible for the connection, order, or dates

of the respective Letters, having left their arrange

ment solely to the fancy of my printer.

THE

CHELTENHAM MAIL BAG.

LETTER I.

FROM C-L-L M-L-D OF CKS, TO THE

RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD P ---T.

Ch-lle, near Cheltenham, Oct. 1819.

MY DEAR LORD,

Although yesterday's post brought you word Of my spirits and health, yet, my ever dear Lord ! I'm sure will rejoice at my pledged re-assurance Of my keen native ardor's unbated endurance, Since there's nothing on earth that appears to my

mind So liberal, so amiable, generous and kind, As the constant, continued, unfading desire, All the cordial endearments of life to inspire,

B

And to furnish the heart and the memory both
With
germs

of true sentiment's national growth;
And I know too, that friendship for ever endures
In a soul so exalted, true, noble, as yours,
My dear Lord!—and with heart ever grateful, sincere,
Your kind reminiscences duly I bear.
-Last week how we missed you !-you cannot con-

ceive

How our hearts for your absence were destined to

grieve! We'd a little “ to do,”- - a few hundred or so, And oh, such a Lion! 'tis all entre nousT'ho' now I think on it, the secret may pass, For the press has got hold of it—thus then it was, My friend, my invalued, my high honoured friend, You know ABOUN HASSAN, did so condescend-Was so kind, so good natured—oh yes, on my word He came to us, just as you would, my dear Lord! In his coach-rather shy that same equipage seems, Tho' the sun on the pannels in red and gold gleams.

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