A Guide to Floriculture: Containing Instructions to the Young Florist, for the Management of the Most Popular Flowers of the Day

Front Cover
Derby, Bradley & Company, 1847 - Floriculture

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 75 - In every breast hath sown these early seeds Of love and admiration, yet in vain, Without fair culture's kind parental aid, Without enlivening suns, and genial showers, And shelter from the blast, in vain we hope The tender plant should rear its blooming head, Or yield the harvest promised in its spring. Nor yet will every soil with equal stores Repay the tiller's labour ; or attend His will, obsequious, whether to produce The olive or the laurel.
Page 5 - To each fine impulse ? a discerning sense Of decent and sublime, with quick disgust From things deform'd, or disarranged, or gross In species'! This, nor gems, nor stores of gold, Nor purple state, nor culture can bestow; But God alone when first his active hand Imprints the secret bias of the soul He, mighty parent!
Page 230 - The Angel of the flowers, one day, Beneath a Rose-tree sleeping lay, That spirit, to whose charge...
Page 157 - tis true : 'tis true, 'tis pity ; And pity 'tis, 'tis true : a foolish figure ; But farewell it, for I will use no art. Mad let us grant him then : and now remains, That we find out the cause of this effect ; Or, rather say, the cause of this defect ; For this effect, defective, comes by cause : Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.
Page 47 - Not a tree, A plant, a leaf, a blossom, but contains A folio volume. We may read, and read, And read again, and still find something new, Something to please, and something to instruct, E'en in the noisome weed.
Page 229 - But nature makes that mean: so, over that art, Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race: this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rather, but The art itself is nature.
Page 260 - On the charmed eye, the exulting florist marks With secret pride the wonders of his hand. No gradual bloom is wanting from the bud...
Page 168 - Even shooting listless languor through the deeps ; Then seek the bank where flowering elders crowd, Where scatter'd wild the lily of the vale Its balmy essence breathes, where cowslips hang The dewy head, where purple violets lurk, With all the lowly children of the shade...
Page 5 - Active, and strong, and feelingly alive To each fine impulse, — a discerning sense Of decent and sublime, with quick disgust From things deform'd, or disarranged, or gross In species? This, nor gems, nor stores of gold, Nor purple state, nor culture can bestow; But God alone, when first His active hand Imprints the secret bias of the soul.
Page 103 - In every walk ! — that here might shoot Thy scions, and thy buds expand, A hundred from one root ! Thrice welcome, little English Flower ! To me the pledge of Hope unseen ! When sorrow would my soul o'erpower For joys that were, or might have been, I'll call to mind, how — fresh and green, I saw thee waking from the dust, — Then turn to heaven with brow serene, And place in God my trust.

Bibliographic information