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A little nearer Spenser; to make roome For Shakespeare in your threefold, fourfold tombe To lodge all foure in one bed make a shift, Until doom's day; for hardly will a fifth, Between this day and that by fates be slaine, For whom your curtaines may be drawn - again.

For the Literary Magazine.

The following ode is said to have been written by a lady, in the north of En. gland, who for many years had been oppressed with a hopeless consumption.

O DE TO SICKN ESS.

NOT to the rosy maid, whom former hours Beheld me fondly covet, tune I now The melancholy lyre : no more I seek Thy aid, H&eia" / sought so long in vall n : But, 'tis to thee, O Sickness, ’tis to thee I wake the silent strings. Accept the lay. Thou * no tyrant, warring the fierce scourge O'er unresisting victims; but a nymph, Of mild, though mournful mein. Upon thy brow Patience sits smiling; and whose heavy eye, Tho' moist with tears, is always fixed - on Heaven. Thou wrapps’t the world in gloom; but thou canst tell Of worlds where all is sunshine; and at length, When thro' this vale of sorrow thou hast led Thy patient, suff’rers, cheering them the while With many a smile of promise, thy pale hand Unlocks the bowers of everlasting rest; Where death’s kind angel waits to dry their tears, And crown them with his amaranthine flowers.

* The goddess of health.

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Meanwhile, even in this transitory scene, Of what hast thou deprived me? Has . - thy hand Clos'd up the book of knowledge; drawn a veil O'er the fair face of nature; or des. troyed The tender pleasures of domestic life? Ah no! 'tis thine to call forth in the heart Each better feeling: there That unconfined Philanthropy, which feels For all the unhappy—that warm sympath Which, casting every selfish care aside, Finds its own bliss in seeing others blest— That melancholy, tender, yet sublime, Which, feeling all the nothingness of earth, Exalts the soul to Heaven than these, That pure devotion, which, even in the hour Of agonizing pain, can fill the eyes With tears of ecstacy—such tears, perhaps, As angels love to shed.

thou awakenest

; and, more

These are thy gifts, O Sickness

These to me

Thou hast vouchsafed, and taught me how to prize.

Shall my soul shrink from aught thou hast ordain’d 2

Shall I e'en envy the luxurious train,

Around whose path Prosperity has StreWn

Her gilded toys’ Ah! let them still pursue

The shining trifles! never shall they know

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Such pure and holy pleasures as await The heart refin’d by suffering. Not to them Does Fancy sing her wild romantic song : *Tis not for them her glowing hand undraws The sacred veil that hides the angelic world; They hear not in the music of the wind Celestial voices, that in whispers sweet, Call to the flowers—the young and bashful flowers' They see not, at the shadowy hour of eve, Descending spirits, who on silver wing Glide thro’ the air, and to their harps divine Sing, in soft notes, the vesper hymn of praise; Or, pausing for a moment, as they turn

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JALFRED–Gulielmo to Gulielma—“Cynthia the saint free from sin,” &c. are not sufficiently correct for publication. Diogenes would be a valuable correspondent to the “Spirit of the

Press.”

Mr. Clark's statements of the Louisiana soil and products have been already set apart for re-publication in this work. The editor heartily con

curs with Agricola.

Martin’s portrait of a good wife is good enough for a likeness, but not

sufficiently laboured for a ficture. sign-post angel.

A devil by Raphael is better than a

The Traveller's communications will be gratefully received. An early

communication is requested.

Theron will be returned when called for. The Missionary Magazine is the proper repository for communications of this nature. The editor endeavours to avoid all polemics, whether religious or political.

There are several communications, on which, agreeably to the request

of the writers, the editor is silent.

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will observe, by reference to the invoice, sixty-seven specimens of earths, salts, and minerals, and sixty specimens of plants; these are accompanied by their respective labels, expressing the days on which obtained, places where found, and also their virtues and properties when known. By means of these labels, reference may be made to the chart of the Missouri, forwarded to the secretary of war, on which the encampment of each day has been carefully marked : thus the places at which these specimens have been obtained, may be easily pointed out, or again found, should any of them prove valuable to the community on further investigation. You will also receive here with enclosed, a part of captain Clark’s private journal; the other part you will find enclosed in a separate tin box. This journal will serve to give you the daily details of our progress and transactions. I shall dispatch a canoe with three, perhaps four persons from the extreme navigable point of the Missouri, or the portage between this river. and the Columbia river, as either may first happen. By the return of this canoe, I shall send you my journal, and some one or two of the best of those kept by my men. I have sent a journal kept by one of the sergeants, to captain Stoddard, my agent at St. Louis, in order as much as possible to multiply the chances of saving something. We have encouraged our men to keep journals, and seven of them do, to whom, in this respect, we give every assistance in our power. I have transmitted to the secretary at war every information relative to the geography of the country which we possess, together with a view of the Indian nations, containing information relative to them, on those points with which I conceived it important that the government should be informed. By reference to the muster rolls forwarded to the war department, you will see the state of the party; in addition to which we have two interpreters, one negro man, servant to captain Clark; one Indian woman, wife to one of the interpreters, and a Mandan man, whom we take with a view to restore peace between the Snake Indians and those in this neighbourhood, amounting in total with ourselves to thirty-three persons. By means of the interpreters and Indians, we shall be enabled to converse with all the Indians that we shall probably meet with on the Missouri. I have forwarded to the secretary at war my public accounts, rendered up to the present day. They have been much longer delayed than I had any idea they would have been, when we departed from the Illinois; but this delay, under the circumstances which I was compelled to act, has been unavoidable. The provision peroque and her crew could not have been dismissed in time to have returned to St. Louis last fall, without evidently, in my opinion, hazarding the fate of the enterprise in which I am en... gaged; and I therefore did not hesitate to prefer the censure that I may have incurred by the detention of these papers, to that of risking in any degree the success of the expedition. To me the detention of these papers has formed a serious source of disquiet and anxiety ; and the recollection of your particular charge to me on this subject, has made it still more poignant. I am fully aware of the inconvenience which must have arisen to the war department, from the want of these vouchers, previous to the last session of congress, but how to avert it was out of my power to devise. From this place we shall send the barge and crew early to-morrow morning, with orders to proceed as expeditiously as possible to St. Louis; by her we send our dispatches, which I trust will get safe to hand. Her crew consists of ten able-bodied men, well armed, and provided with a

, sufficient stock of provision to last them to St. Louis. I have but little

doubt but they will be fired on by the Siouxs; but they have pledged themselves to us that they will not yield while there is a man of them living. I

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