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Books Books 1 - 10 of 104 on I had a thing to say, but let it go: The sun is in the heaven, and the proud day,....
" I had a thing to say, but let it go: The sun is in the heaven, and the proud day, Attended with the pleasures of the world, Is all too wanton and too full of gawds To give me audience: if the midnight bell Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth, Sound... "
The mysterious freebooter; or, The days of queen Bess - Page 292
by Francis Lathom - 1806
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The Plays of William Shakspeare: Accurately Printed from the Text of Mr ...

William Shakespeare - 1806
...gawds, To give me audience: — If the midnight hell Did , 'With his iron tongue au'd 'brazen TOouth, Sound one unto the drowsy race of night ; If this...churchyard where we stand. And thou possessed with a thonsand wroags ; Or if that surly spirit , melancholy , Had bak'd thy blood, and made it heavy, thick;...
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The plays of William Shakespeare ...: With the corrections and ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare, Joseph Dennie, Samuel Johnson, George Steevens - 1806
...repetition of the strokes at twelve, it gives n much more forcihle warning than when it only .strikes one. If this same were a church-yard where we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs; Such was once my opinion concerning the old reading; hut, 0B re-consideration, its propriety cannot...
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The Plays of William Shakespeare: With the Corrections and ..., Volume 7

William Shakespeare - 1806
...petition of the strokes at twelve, it gives a much more forcihl warning than when it only strikes one. If this same were a church-yard where we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs ; Such was once my opinion concerning the old reading; hut, om re-consideration, its propriety cannot...
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The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare: With Explanatory Notes ..., Volume 1

William Shakespeare, Samuel Ayscough - 1807
...midnight bell . ):i\ with his iron tongue and brazen mouth, 'Sound on1 unto the drowsy rave of night ; f this same were a church-yard where we stand. And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs ; 3r if that surly spirit, melancholy, iad bak'd thy blood, and made it heavy, thick ; Which, else,...
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The British Theatre; Or, A Collection of Plays: Which are Acted at the ...

Elizabeth Inchbald - English drama - 1808
...with the pleasures of the world, Is all too wanton, and too full of gawds, To give me audience : — If the midnight bell Did, with his iron tongue and...drowsy race of night ; If this same were a churchyard were we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs ; Or if that surly spirit, Melancholy, Had...
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The British Theatre, Or, A Collection of Plays, which are Acted at the ...

Mrs. Inchbald - English drama - 1808
...the world, Is all too wanton, and too full of gawds, To give me audienee : — -If the midnight boll Did, with his iron tongue and brazen mouth, Sound...drowsy race of night ; If this same were a churchyard were we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs ; Or if that surly spirit, Melancholy, Had...
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An Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare: Compared with the Greek ...

Elizabeth Robinson Montagu - Comparative literature - 1810 - 296 pages
...Attended with the pleasures of the world, Is all too wanton, and too full of gaudes, To give me audience. If the midnight bell Did with his iron tongue and...we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs j Or if that surly spirit melancholy Had bak'd thy blood, and made it heavy thick, Which else runs...
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The romance of the forest, by the authoress of 'A Sicilian romance'.

Ann Radcliffe - 1820
...purpose : " If the midnight bell Did with his iron tongue and brazen mouth Sound one unto the drowsy ear of night, If this same were a churchyard where we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs, — — — — if thou couldst see me without eyes, Hear me without thine ears, and make reply Without...
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The British Novelists: With an Essay, and Prefaces ..., Volume 43, Part 1

English literature - 1820
...purpose: << If the midnight bell Did with his iron tongue and brazen mouth Sound one unto the drowsy ear of night, If this same were a churchyard where we stand, And thou possessed with a thousand wrongs, ' if thou couldst see me without eyes, Hear me without thine ears, and make reply Without a tongue,"...
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The New monthly magazine and universal register. [Continued as] The New ...

1842
...window, and sets the Columbines a-dancing in that_C'hina vase. But suppose, as King John says, that The midnight bell Did, with his iron tongue and brazen...night : If this same were a churchyard, where we stand — the grass damp — the wind at east — the night pitch-dark — a strangely ill odour, and doubtful...
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